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Transition Coaching

Are you in transition?  Listen to my interview, by Bert Martinez, on Money for Lunch on Transitions.

 

 

What’s on your plate? If you have too much, get rid of some things.

What is on your plate?

Life is like a buffet plate

One of the fantastic women I interviewed for my book on work life success, Kimberly Foss, told me that a professional woman’s life is similar to a buffet plate.  Everything looks good and as you go through the buffet table. You keep on piling up food.  The problem is our plate size is limited. Some things need to be removed from our plate before we can add-on more.

How many of us are living our day-to-day life with overflowing plates?  It is not only unhealthy, it is also difficult to digest.  We have work commitments, care for our spouses & children, do countless household chores, travel, manage our finances & try to keep ourselves healthy.  For women, it’s mostly our downtime and eventually our health that suffers, while we desperately try to do all things and have it all.

Are you feeling overwhelmed by trying to have it all?  Instead of living life with an overflowing and unhealthy plate, perhaps it would be good to take some time out and visualize what’s on your plate.  It is never too late to take things off your plate.  This can be done once you are clear on your priorities.  Priorities change, so it is totally fine to coach yourself to reorder them periodically as needed.

Break your life into categories

I like to visualize my full life as a full plate with the following categories which I prioritize depending on my situation.

  1. Spiritual Life or centeredness
  2. Health & Fitness
  3. Financial Management
  4. Family & Relationships
  5. Child &/or Elder Care
  6. Career or Business
  7. Fun and recreational activities
  8. Housework or maintenance work

I like to regularly assess where I am on each of these areas and adjust accordingly.  During my corporate life, most of my time was committed to work, with very little time left for fun and recreational activities.  The awareness of how unbalanced my plate looked was enough for me to make some simple changes like walking regularly.  Eventually walking was not enough and I took on a more intense cardio and flexibility workout, I discovered and eventually got hooked to hot yoga.  It was not only a healthy workout; I enjoyed what it did to my health and overall wellbeing.

When I needed to add something to my plate, something needed to be given up.  It either goes off the list, gets outsourced or delegated.   Several years ago, as my career took off and travel increased, my husband picked up managing our day-to-day budget.  It was not easy for me to give this up, but I noticed my stress levels decreased as he ramped up managing our finances.  Years later, I am glad we made this shift; he became so good at managing our budget & investments that I was able to retire from my corporate life as soon as our youngest daughter graduated from college.  As my career took an even bigger portion of my plate, finances, gardening and cooking moved over to my husband’s plate.  He’s a much better cook anyway and loves to garden.

What’s on your plate?  What can you move out?

See also LinkedIn and Emotional Intelligence

 

5 steps to creating a legacy

Aryae Coppersmith role modeled how to create a legacy with dignity.

What is your legacy?

Top senior influential human resources executives in Silicon Valley gathered at Juniper Networks to honor Aryae Coppersmith, the beloved founder of HR Forums (hrforums.com ) which has been in existence for 15 years.  Aryae was moving on to new challenges.

As the HR leaders honored Aryae’s contribution to the growth of our profession, I couldn’t help but reflect on how he brought extremely busy senior HR leaders and their CEOs together for conversation and leave a lasting legacy. Maybe you have already figured out your legacy, maybe you haven’t.

Here are lessons learned from my friend Aryae to get you started with your legacy:

  • It was never about Aryae.  Aryae represented a cause – bringing HR leaders together informally to grow, share and support each other.  He was always the guiding force behind the movement but the spotlight was on the members, their guests and their contribution.
  • Build Community & Trust – the group fondly remembered dinners and breakfasts where top of mind issues of CHROs and key executives were discussed in confidence.  The CHRO role is a tough and lonely one to have and having an intimate group of peers who they could trust was just what they needed.
  • Ask “How I can Help?”  As networks were re-ignited and new ones built, people were sincerely interested in the other person’s life.  Aryae was always interested in others, he sincerely listened, and remembered well.  He kept in touch, even after people have moved on.
  • Emotional connection – As colleagues said goodbye to each other, I know they will never really say good-bye to Aryae.  There was a deep emotional connection in the air, a sign of a lasting legacy.
  • The bigger purpose will bind us together.  Aryae shared his inspiration for his next chapter.  Based on research, he said that in 10 years or so, there will still be poverty, homelessness and lack of education in the world for about 3B people.  He doesn’t want that to happen.  He is doing something today so our future will be so much better.  He created One World Lights, oneworldlights.com, an organization connecting people from all over the world who are doing what they can in their communities to make this world better and learn from each other. More blessings and fun on your New Act Aryae!

Whatever your life situation is,  it is not too late to think about your lasting legacy.  What would yours be about?  Please feel free to share your thoughts.

See LinkedIn and High Achieving Women

Use Power of Intention to Grow Your Career

family airplane

Liza Sichon explains how the Power of Intention helped grow her career. Liza reports:

One evening, I was pondering my next career move and thought it would be cool to take the kids on a trip to Europe the next year.  The idea grew on me and before I knew it, I entertained a string of “What If” possibilities for my career and my family.

What if?

What if we actually move to Europe for a couple of years? What if I take an international assignment in Europe?  Wouldn’t that be really nice?  The more I thought about it, the more attractive the idea became. I started thinking of what is possible: new experiences , new learning, meet new people and all the tangible and intangible benefits that my family and career could have.

That night, I did not sleep at all. I planned, strategized and got really excited about the possibilities.  This desire and intention continued to grow day by day, a seed was planted and it started to grow.  I shared the idea with my husband – he thought I was crazy.  I shared it with my trusted colleagues and a few months later, I was offered the job to lead human resources International – responsible for the regions outside the United States.

I cannot forget my boss’ words to me – you can live anywhere, as long as it is outside New Jersey (our headquarters). I narrowed our choices to London, Singapore and Brussels and eventually chose Brussels.  It is where our company’s European headquarters was located, a central location between Asia and the US and a more convenient time zone to connect globally.

My husband saw the possibilities and with his support, we were on a plane to Belgium a few months later.

The entire preparation and move was of course, complex and difficult, and we focused to get it done. I do not know if it was desire, focus, intention, God’s will, family support or a combination of all that made it happen.  The intent was strong enough to handle any hurdle or obstacle that came our way. If you find yourself wanting something more from your career, here are a few things to think about:

  • Think and Dream It – What is it that you really want?.  Visualize it and see the picture in your mind.  Stay with the dream.  If it is strong and coming from your heart, continue to think about what is possible.  Eventually your heart and mind will align and focus on the dream.
  • Speak It – Share it with your loved ones, your supportive colleagues, your mentors.  Speak your career aspirations to others, no matter how outrageous it may sound.  Ask for advice and listen.  Filter your listening to what is possible.
  • Work It – Take the first step to get closer to the goal. Ask around, pursue some leads. Take some phone calls.  Work on the details.  Work hard at it and do not give up.

Moving our family to Europe and back was not easy.  It was exhausting, the experience tested our resilience while we attended to the many details of the move, selling our home, moving our stuff to storage, giving away some items, settling down and going though the repatriation process after two years.  It was well worth it. It was one of the most enriching experiences for our family and my career on all fronts.

If you have the desire for a career shift, listen to that inner voice and work with a coach to make your career goals happen.

 

Should I bring in an executive coach? Where’s the ROI in that?

Can an Executive Coach help me increase revenue?

Can Executive Coaching help me increase revenue?

Can an Executive Coach help me increase revenue?

Yes. Liza Sichon explains…I was asked to coach a general manager of a growing business. He needed to increase his revenue by 400% in the next three years. In order to achieve this, he chose four critical objectives to work on: develop his team, hire additional staff, establish processes and identify tools to sustain his new business.  He also wanted to develop his own personal leadership style.

 

He also needed to prioritize these objectives.  My client realized that he allowed several distractions to get in his way. The corporate politics, changing agenda and his team’s own inability to handle conflict were some of the items in the way. My client also identified what was in his own way – his limiting beliefs and lack of confidence. He needed to build stronger alliances with his peers instead of unconsciously alienating them. None of these would have been brought to the surface without the assessment and coaching conversations.

 

In order to calculate the qualitative value of executive coaching engagement, we identified a few key behavioral changes, as measured by a pre and post interview or survey instrument along with a few key quantifiable measurements selected at the beginning of the coaching relationship.

 

My client was very good at setting stretch goals and realized through feedback, that his team wanted him to believe in them.  He appeared formal and no-nonsense to his team who needed to have a stronger relationship with him. My client struggled with the human elements of building trusting relationships.  Through our coaching and 360 assessments, he was able to increase his self-awareness of how he can come across as too focused on the task and seemingly not caring about the people.  He learned new ways to improve his behavior with this direct team.

 

As he became more comfortable in his own leadership role, he was able to stretch his own team leaders and raise his standards.  He transitioned from being a leader who told people what to do, to a leader who empowered his team.  His team responded to his new style, began to trust him more and went above and beyond to deliver results.

 

What do I get in return for executive coaching?

When will I see my ROI when hiring an HR coach?

When will I see my ROI when hiring an HR coach?

“Executive coaching engagements for senior executives run an average of 6-12 months at a minimum,” says Liza Sichon of Executive HR Coach. “To have a coaching engagement less than this, in my opinion, would not result in substantial benefit for the client and the company.”

 

To calculate the value and ROI (Return on Investment) of executive coaching, identify the quantifiable and qualifiable objectives of the coaching engagement and the cost of the coaching.

 

The quantitative ROI is calculated by dividing the benefit (return) of an investment by the cost of the investment, the result is expressed as a percentage or ratio.

 

ROI = (Gain of Investment – Cost of Investment)/Cost of Investment

Most coaching engagements and research claim to have at least a 500-700% ROI of executive coaching. (ICF article, AM Grant 2012)

Some of the additional metrics used to measure coaching success are:

  • Retention or planned attrition of key direct reports
  • Placement or promotion of client into key role
  • Leadership development, as measured by Cultural improvement measurements and 360 Leadership Impact surveys
  • Behavioral Improvement
  • Employee Engagement improvement
  • 360 Improvement results like Emotional Intelligence 360 surveys.
  • Client well-being, decreased stress, work life balance and/or  improved engagement.

 

Why do we need assessments in coaching?

Why do we need assessments in coaching?

Why do we need assessments in coaching?

Assessments reveal information that are either known or unknown to the client.  Some of the information we gather through assessments are the culture of the organization, leadership style, team dynamics, management strengths and areas of development, personal motivations and natural skills, to name a few.  Assessments reveal blind spots, hidden or underused talents, overused strengths and patterns.  Assessments give you a clear picture of what you are experiencing in an objective and quantifiable format. Taken over time, assessments will provide you with a picture of your progress.

 

There are many proven valid and reliable assessments in the market today, the choice of which assessment to use in a given situation is a competitive advantage of the executive coach.  There are executive coaches who are certified and promote only 1 or 2 proprietary assessments, there are also coaches who are certified in several assessments.  What is important is not the number of certifications that a coach has.  What is critical is to have a coach who can identify the true problem that you are trying to solve and provide the appropriate assessment to reveal a picture of your current situation, strengths and areas of improvement.

 

Assessments will also save  you precious time.  They provide you with information that would take months or even years to collect.  The ROI of leadership assessment tools are exponentially high.  In an investment in time of an hour or so, an on-line assessment can give you a wealth of information that you can use to improve your own leadership or company culture.  The use of assessments as the foundation of executive coaching, provides a high ROI in improved performance of the leader and his team.

 

What has been the most valuable assessment that you have taken?  Why is it valuable?

Why bother getting a career coach? I’m doing just fine, I think.

Why should you get a career coach in the first place?

Career Coach Liza Sichon

How can Liza Sichon help your career today?

As you progress in your career, you will need to plan and strategize how you can grow with someone you can trust. What are the key learning experiences that you need to have to realize your dream career? A trained career coach will help you grow your leadership and your career.

Three benefits you will realize from your career coach

  • A career coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your career coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.
  • A career coach is a trusted confidant. You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your career coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A career coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?
  • A career coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The career coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” A career coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

The sky is the limit for Daphne

I have a new client, Daphne. She thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in a career coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

What does success with an executive coach look like? Can one help me?

Are you working harder than ever but seeing your friends getting the good promotions? It may be time for an executive coach.

I spoke with Liza Sichon of http://Executivehrcoach.com about career stagnation. She feels an executive coach may help get you, and your career, back on track. Liza told me about a client, Daphne

How Liza helped Daphne, and can help you too.

Daphne thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in an executive coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

An executive coach can help you in these ways:

  • An executive coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.
  • You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your executive coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?
  • it may be time for an executive coach

    If you’re not happy at work, it may be time for an executive coach

  • An executive coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” An executive coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

For more, see Linkedin.com and What would you say to your younger self?

Stuck at the same old job? Maybe an executive coach is the answer.

Are you working harder than ever but seeing your friends getting the good promotions? It may be time for an executive coach.

I spoke with Liza Sichon of http://Executivehrcoach.com about career stagnation. She feels an executive coach may help get you, and your career, back on track. Liza said an executive coach can help you in these ways:

  • An executive coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.
  • You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your executive coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?
  • it may be time for an executive coach

    If you’re not happy at work, it may be time for an executive coach

  • An executive coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” An executive coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

How Liza helped Daphne, and can help you too

Liza told me about her new client, Daphne. Daphne thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in an executive coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

For more, see Linkedin.com and What would you say to your younger self?

 

My career is stagnant. How can an executive coach help me?

Are you frustrated at work? It may be time for an executive coach.

I spoke with Liza Sichon of http://Executivehrcoach.com about career stagnation. She feels an executive coach may help get you, and your career, back on track. Liza said an executive coach can help you in these three ways:

      • An executive coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.
      • You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your executive coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?
it may be time for an executive coach

If you’re not happy at work, it may be time for an executive coach

      • An executive coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” An executive coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

How Liza helped Daphne, and can help you too

Liza told me about her new client, Daphne. Daphne thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in an executive coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

For more, see Linkedin.com and What would you say to your younger self?

 

Are global leaders born or made? You may be surprised…

Are global leaders born or made?

Are global leaders born or made?

Are global leaders born or made?

This is a very common question frequently asked in our workshops. Another common question is — where do I begin to develop myself as a global leader?  How do I identify young talent who have global potential?

 

I think the answer is both. Global leaders are born with that special gene, have it in them to be global citizens and at the same time, they can further develop themselves to be effective global leaders. Being in the global spotlight starts with a deep curiosity, appreciation and respect for cultures and lifestyles other than your own.

 

I believe global citizenship is a yearning, a calling and a seed planted in you that needs to grow, be fulfilled and expressed. You know it when you have it. You are naturally curious about what is in store for you out there. You have an adventurous mind & spirit and make traveling to distant places a priority whether in your studies, for leisure, for work and in general, in your life. Traveling to a new country or city is the highlight of your vacation, you do not like to go to the same place every time you take time off. You are comfortable in strange, unusual or vastly different settings and find a way to connect what is new and unfamiliar to something that you can appreciate.

 

Having this inborn curiosity is not a guarantee that you will be successful global leaders. There are leadership behaviors that you need to acquire to be successful globally. The global behaviors described in the book by Sharkey, Cook et.al, Winning with Transglobal Leadership, 2011 and its accompanying 360 Transglobal Leadership survey are used by global companies to develop global leaders in today’s fast paced & complex global world. I also recommend that you work with an executive coach to identify your strengths and areas of improvement.

 

Content from http://executivehrcoach.com/global-leaders-born-made/ and http://linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

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Why Hire a coach?

Top Reasons Coaches are Engaged:

(HBR Jan 2009)

    • Develop high potentials or facilitate transition: 48%
    • Act as a sounding board: 26%
    • Address derailing behavior: 12%