Careers

What is Your Global Acumen?

Global HR Academy

Have you ever wondered how effective you are as a global leader?

What are the key competencies you need to have to be successful in your global assignment?

How do you identify, attract and retain your global talent pool?

Are you ready to take your global leadership to the next level?  Join us with a select group of leaders at the 20th Leadership Development Conference of The Conference Board on June 3-5 in San Diego

At the Succession Management Pre Conference on June 3,  you will learn how to:

  • Recognize, assess, and select talent global talent
  • Analyze and refine your development practices in light of global demands
  • Develop a network of senior professionals who are addressing similar challenges

To learn more about the Conference, please visit our website https://www.conference-board.org/conferences/conferencedetail.cfm?conferenceid=2609

 

 

Low Stress High Paying Jobs

lostresshipay Need a change in career?  Can’t decide how to make a living while doing what you love? Is your career giving you stress?   Are you thinking about a career shift?  How would you like to have a career that pays well and gives you the balance that you want?

Here are some things to think about.

Read this article by Terri Williams published at Yahoo.  http://education.yahoo.net/articles/low_stress_high_pay_jobs.htm

     

Three Valuable Lessons I Learned in my Global Assignment

woman globeIt has been several years since our expat assignment in Belgium but the experience remains fresh in my mind. The two years we spent in Belgium strengthened not only my career and understanding of global business but also my family’s bond.  The experience enriched our lives. Being an Asian American female executive in Europe sent by an American company holding the top job was not common those days.  I was not the typical expat, therefore I was not stereotyped and eventually, I think my uniqueness worked to my advantage.

 

  1. I learned what it takes to work closely and intensely with people from different countries. I learned to accept and appreciate differences including my own uniqueness. I learned that No did not necessarily mean No and Yes did not mean Yes.  I learned to probe further to understand others. I learned to flex my style to be effective.
  2. Since time was limited and we knew this experience would not last, we made instant friends.  We valued our new friends and chose which ones were going to remain our friends even when we moved back home.
  3. I learned a lot about myself. My executive coach was invaluable to me.  At our very first meeting he said since I am Filipino American, I am viewed as an Asian in Europe even if I came from the US.   They expected me to demonstrate typical Asian norms, because this what they know.  I realized how much I’ve forgotten or abandoned being Asian having lived in the US for most of my career years. I took a journey back to who I really am. It was quite an experience to have the freedom to be me again and get in touch with my “Filipina-ness”.

I will never forget my coach, Robert Brown, who helped me navigate through several difficult situations. He became an ally to me, a trusted advisor, mentor and friend.  He introduced me to a new business network who helped me understand local business better. He genuinely cared for my success and became a close family friend.  Sadly, Robert passed away a few years ago.  His influence on my life, career and our family was invaluable and we are forever grateful.

If you are in an expat assignment today or working outside your home country, you may be experiencing a range of emotions – from excitement to frustration.  From loneliness – missing your friends and family , to enjoying meeting new people and discovering new sights and experiences.  How are you viewed by your local colleagues?  What impact does your presence have on them?  How can you make the most of your expat assignment?

 

Join us at The Conference Board, Global HR Academy on June 9-12 and learn more about what it takes to be successful in a global role.  To read more about the Academy, click here http://www.conference-board.org/globalhrleadersacademy/.

 

To apply and receive special pricing, contact Fana Tekle at fana.tekle@conferenceboard.org or call her at 212-339-0210.

 

Unhappy with your job but feel overwhelmed on where to begin?

dash-phone (1)You do not need to feel stuck and overwhelmed in the job search process.  Job searching is a skill and a process that does not yield immediate results. You need to have a positive mindset and energy to take your career to the next level.  JobDash, a new on-line tool will help you navigate through the confusing search engines, resume writing, follow-up and interviewing process to get you hired.

 

JobDash develops software solutions for job seekers and career services professionals. Individuals create free accounts to set a target hire date, follow an effective path to success, and track their progress along the way. An intuitive dashboard and CRM makes it easy to check and modify personal behavior for best results. If you track your finances and fitness to save money and be healthy, why not track your job search to get hired?

 

JobDash for Enterprise helps colleges and universities guide students from classroom to career with real-time metrics to predict and analyze employment outcomes.  I am pleased to be the Career Coach for Jobdash, view their interview on my career at https://jobdash.com/blog/liza-sichon-inspiring-career-coach/#.U3FGra1dVm0

Transition with Ease and Grace. 3 Powerful Coaching Questions to Ask Yourself

golden gate cloudyOne of my potential clients is going through a major transition and called me to inquire about executive coaching.

She is a new mother of 15 month twin girls and is having a tough time balancing her work and personal life.  After working in a senior role for 15 years in a major company, she felt compelled to put in her resignation.  She needed time to rethink her career, finances, and family life and hopefully find a family friendly employer.  She is now in the process of winding down and closing this chapter of her life.

Transition times are tough and can be very stressful.  There is a sense of loss, maybe some humiliation, and a lot of anxiety about the unknown future.  There is also a tinge of excitement and anticipation about creating something new.

You may find yourself in the midst of a major transition.  Here are some coaching questions that could help you during these times.

  1. As you go through this process, notice how you are feeling.  Label it and acknowledge your feelings of the moment.  Do not judge or make this feeling wrong.  Whatever you are feeling is yours and you are entitled to this. Notice the change in your feelings as the transition progresses.  Do not be alarmed if it gets tougher before it gets better.
  2. Notice your thoughts.  What would you like your team and colleagues to remember about you?  What would you like your transition theme to be?
  3. Who are you being throughout all this process?   I’ve been through several transitions throughout my career and continue to do so during my encore career.  We moved 17 times and lived in 3 continents, all transitions have been very stressful, some more than others.  I have a theme or mantra that helped me tremendously whenever I am in transition and that is — “Move with Ease and Grace”.  I meditate on these words every spare moment I have and it never fails to center me.  It keeps me calm and greatly influences how I behave.

Transitions are wonderful, they give us hope, enable us to change to have a better life.  When I think of my major transitions, I was fortunate to have a coach guide me through it.  My coach helped make a cloudy and foggy journey clearer and certainly made me aware when I have reached my destination.

Job Search Tips for Graduates

graduatesWith graduation coming up, it’s that time of the year when I receive requests from moms to coach their graduates with their job search. Some basic questions like in what city do you want to work or what industry do you want to work in are not as firm in the new graduates minds as their parents would like it to be.  Therefore discussions on what to do after college becomes a frustrating conversation between parents and their kids who are really confused after spending four years or so in an expensive college.

Below is an excerpt of my conversation with Alexi, a very proactive, smart and coachable college graduate job searcher.  If you are a recent college graduate and looking to get on the job search track, here are some thoughts to get you started:

1. What kind of job do you envision yourself doing in your 30s and in your 40s?.  If you don’t know, don’t worry.  If you do, good for you.  Research or work with a career coach or your guidance counselor to find out entry-level jobs in your field.
2. Have you taken a career assessment that gives you some general direction on how you may apply your natural skills and talents?  If not, I recommend the Ucipher graduate assessment.  It is an on-line tool that provides insight into your strengths and roles that match who you are.  It is also easy to interpret. You can  access the tool by clicking here – http://www.uciphergraduate.com/assessment.aspx
3. My friend, Dana Manciagli,  recently wrote a book – Cut the Crap and Get a Job.  You can look her up on Linked In and Facebook or buy the book at Amazon.  She has lots of tips for the job searcher.  Read the book and incorporate her advice that makes sense to you.
4. Are you open to relocation?  If so, start looking at jobs in your desired location.
5. Are you subscribed to job boards like Indeed or Monster?  Suggest you choose companies that you want to work on and research on the kinds of jobs that they have along your lines of interest.
6. Is your Linked In profile updated?  If not, create a professional one.  There are lots of jobs posted in Linked In.  Add your resume to your Linked In profile with a nice professional picture that shows your face.  Sign up for job leads in your areas of interest.  Start networking and connecting with friends, former teachers, neighbors, club members etc on Linked In.
Alexi wanted to know if he should remain anonymous in Linked In since he is job searching.  I disagreed.  Looking for an entry-level job after college and viewing career information is not something to hide or be ashamed of.
7. Set goals.  Decide how many applications you will send out or how many contacts you will reach out in a day and make this your priority above all else.
8. Lastly, know that finding a job is a full-time job.  Invest in it and treat it like a special project. Do not be discouraged by the rejections or lack of communication from companies.  Keep a positive attitude – you only need one great job offer, the more rejections, the closer you will be to your job.
But first, we need to figure out what kind of jobs you are interested in applying, then we can tailor your resume to the job and start applying.  It takes a couple of months to get into the swing of a job search.  The perfect job is just waiting for you out there.
Alexi is a terrific coachee.  He took  the assessment and  career advise and asked very good questions.  I have no doubt that he will be finding his perfect job in no time.

 

Intent vs Impact. 5 Ways to Match Your Intent with Your Desired Impact

Have you ever received feedback that meant something to you?  Feedback that was constructive? Feedback that has changed your approach and made you a better person?

Recently, we completed a leadership development workshop with a client and his direct reports.  We used a powerful 360 assessment tool called Leadership Impact.  Each participperformance reviewant received feedback on their leadership effectiveness with a set of recommended strategies that would make them better leaders. Some were quite surprised by the feedback, some were not.  All were very appreciative of the opportunity to pause and think about how they are viewed by their peers, their bosses and their direct reports.

In my experience, most leaders generally have good intentions.  They want to grow their business, develop their people, build a team and achieve higher margins.  How leaders behave, the actions they take, what they say or do makes a difference on the impact that they want to have. This impact may or may not reflect their positive intentions.

How can you ensure that your intention matches your impact?

1. Be very clear about your intent.  What is it exactly that you want to achieve?  Is it to motivate others to do better? Build stronger relationships? Defend your points?

2. How are you going to communicate your intent?  Are you going to send an email, pick up the phone or wait until you have a face to face meeting?  The more important the issue, the more real-time conversation you will want to have.

3. What message will match your intent?  If your intent is to motivate, you may want to use more encouraging language vs criticizing or nitpicking.  According to the research of Heaphy and Losada 2004, (The Role of Positivity & Connectivity in the Performance of Business Teams)  high performing teams provide positive feedback to each other in the ratio of 5.6 to 1 whereas low performing teams have an average of .36 to 1 with almost 3 negative comments to 1 positive comment with each other.

4. Deliver the message and ask for feedback.  Did your message reflect your intention?  In the example of motivating others, ask the recipient how your message was received.  Was it motivational or discouraging?  Ask how you could have better delivered your message.  Ask how the person felt after your conversation.

5. Practice.  Over time you will be more versed on how to match your intent and your impact.  Yes, there is a place for negative feedback, usually when one is in a downward spiral or about to hurt themselves.  Such conversations have an appropriate place and time.

Are you interested in learning about your impact on others?  Ever wondered why you are not achieving the results that you want or perhaps are unable to sustain high performance?  A trained peer coach or external executive coach can help interpret your assessment and help you change your leadership strategy to take your game to the next level.

 

Why HR professionals think they do not need a coach

woman executiving talkingI had a conversation with an HR Executive recently about her business leader who needs an Executive Coach.  In the process of our conversation, she realized that she also wanted to have her own coach.  But she is hesitant to hire one.

Why is it that HR professionals quickly diagnose when a situation needs coaching but rarely do they raise their hands to ask for their own coach? Here are some reasons:

1. They may be embarrassed to admit that they cannot resolve their own leadership gaps?

2. They are used to solving other people’s problems, and are hesitant to face their own?

3. They do not think they deserve to have their own coach.  We are conditioned to being viewed as an expense.

4. They don’t want to call attention to themselves or be viewed as having a “problem”.  To the unenlightened, having a coach was traditionally  and incorrectly viewed as being a failure.

During the course of our conversation, I offered to coach her.  She was very thankful for the coaching conversation.  She is sharp, energetic and strategic but suffered from having everything in her head.  Talking through her options and choices empowered and refreshed her.  She became clearer on her course of action.

Working through issues with my coach have been some of the most powerful dialogues I’ve had in my career.  The answers have always been within me, I just needed a trusted advisor and partner to work through my options without judgement.

If you  need to work through certain choices, or are in the midst of transition or change, feel stuck or overwhelmed, work it through with a trained executive coach or email me at liza@executivehrcoach.com for a complimentary session.

How to Succeed while on a Global Assignment

global assignmentHave you just moved halfway around the world, sold your belongings or placed them in storage? Do you struggle to learn the local language? Are you on a plane most of the time, constantly jet lagged and have a huge fog in your head? Is headquarters calling you for regular updates? Do you feel like you owe your company for sending you in this assignment that you are willing to work day and night to prove your worth? You take conference calls at all times, they seem to forget that you are in a different time zone.

In the meantime, your personal life is non-existent, business pressures don’t seem to lighten up and you have not had the time to explore your new world.  You set some goals before you took this assignment – trips to explore the local sights, learn the local language, make friends with locals, but your work and travel have taken priority and you are stressed and lack sleep.

As glamorous as the word expat may sound, the reality of many expats lives are far from it.  Expats do not travel for leisure or live a life of discovery and exploration. Expats work long hours and take on the pressure of running the local business. They do not have their support system and they miss their family and friends.

The difficulties of expat lives can be managed and the assignment can be memorable and career enhancing.  Handled well, this could be a period of huge growth and development for the expat, their family and their careers.  What are some of the ways that your expat assignment can be successful?

  1. Keep headquarters regularly informed.  Set up regular calls or emails to let your bosses know the local conditions.  Try not to surprise them.  If you have bad news, deliver bad news in a timely manner with a couple of solutions that you have vetted out with your local team members.  Stay connected with mentors back in the home country and set up regular calls with them.
  2. Develop a new support system locally.  Find people who you can trust inside the company and outside.  Join your local professional organization and make the time to nurture new relationships.
  3. Learn at least 10 most popular local words – words of greeting, respect, agreement or disagreement, common courtesy words.
  4. Find a way to exercise regularly or find ways to keep your mind, body and spirit clear and centered.
  5. Figure out the number of weekends or vacation days that you have and plan to see the local sights.  Book your tickets.  Before you know it, your assignment is up and you would not have been able to see the sights if you didn’t plan in advance for it.
  6. Plan your home vacations yearly so you have something to look forward to.  Keep connected with friends and family through social media.
  7. Hire a local coach, find a trusted mentor.  This has been the most valuable thing I have done while on expat assignment, one that I would recommend to everyone outside of their home country.  Your trusted coach will help you gain perspective, reframe your thinking, challenge you when needed or push you out of your comfort zone to grow.

 

Being out of your comfort zone, while difficult, is a period of high growth and eventually high rewards.  An expat assignment is not for everyone, but you have that call inside you and you have it in you to succeed. With the right moves and a trusted support system, the benefits of an expat assignment far outweigh the challenges and difficulties.  Enjoy the journey.

How to Identify, Coach and Develop a Transglobal Leader

EmpoweringTeams2013My workshop in Prague was about developing talent for effectiveness in multicultural settings.  As businesses evolve to be more virtually global, employees who are prepared and coached for global assignments have more confidence, respect and engagement with their multicultural colleagues.

Based on the research and published best-selling business book Winning with Transglobal Leadership of Sharkey, Cooke, Razi and Barge, a new model of leadership called the Transglobal Leader is emerging. This is the leader who successfully works across boundaries, cultures and countries embodying the five leadership behaviors of successful global leaders: Uncertainty Resilience, Team Connectivity, Pragmatic Flexibility, Perceptive Responsiveness and Talent Orientation.

At the workshop, participants assessed their own transglobal leadership skills, created an action plan and learned a coaching model to improve and develop their effectiveness in a multicultural setting.  Participants walked away with a framework for organizational effectiveness that they can adapt to their own organizations.

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Why Hire a coach?

Top Reasons Coaches are Engaged:

(HBR Jan 2009)

    • Develop high potentials or facilitate transition: 48%
    • Act as a sounding board: 26%
    • Address derailing behavior: 12%