Coaching

As an HR Leader, do you have emotional intelligence?

How emotionally intelligent is the job candidate? You have to find out before you hire this person.

How emotionally intelligent is the job candidate? You have to find out before you hire this person.

Do you hire for emotional intelligence?

Most HR professionals and recruiters traditionally hire for cognitive intelligence, relevant experience and education.  One aspect overlooked especially in hiring for leadership and managerial positions is to hire for emotionally intelligent leaders who can empower and motivate their teams to reach their highest potential.  Emotional intelligent managers can enable their teams to overcome barriers.  An emotionally intelligent HR leader is aware of the impact of hiring managers who are strong intellectually and emotionally.

 

Leaders are not always aware of their impact on others or if they are remotely aware, they usually underestimate how powerful their impact truly is.  Knowledge of Emotional Intelligence can help you find candidates who can rise to the top of their game, manage complex, difficult and unpredictable situations, and encourage their peers and co-workers to do their best.

 

If you are responsible for hiring, what questions could you ask to determine someone’s emotional intelligence?  In a workshop I co-facilitated with Dr. Relly Nadler for HR Professionals in San Francisco, we identified some questions that could help you determine a candidate’s emotional intelligence.   Dr. Relly Nadler in his book, Leading with Emotional Intelligence recommends behavioral dimensions correlated with the 20 emotional intelligence competencies or EQ.  Here are some of the competencies and examples of questions that you could ask job candidates:

 

Interview questions

  1. Initiative – Give me an example of when you had to go the extra mile for your customer. What did you do and what was the result?
  2. Self Control – When was the last time you were frustrated with your co-worker or customer?  What did you do and say?
  3. Empathy – How do you demonstrate that you are open to ideas and solutions other than you own?
  4. Building Bonds – Tell me an example of an opportunity you developed and successfully received from networking.
  5. Self Confidence – How do you get ready for a big presentation or meeting?
  6. Adaptability – Give me an example when you had to work with a difficult co-worker?

Depending on the role or position that you are hiring, you can evaluate a candidate’s knowledge of themselves, also known as self-awareness, their own self-management, understanding others and managing others – the four main components of emotional intelligence.

 

Emotional Intelligence is contagious.  I once had a boss who loved people.  The entire building literally brightens up when he walks into the office.  He  not only knows people by their first name, he knows their children’s names and even their dog’s names. People would do anything for him, the discretionary effort of his team was beyond limits.  He is so loved and remembered fondly, that is because he truly and sincerely cared for others. Working with him was one of the most enjoyable times in my career.

 

Ever wondered what impact you have on others?  It is not too late to develop your emotional intelligence.  Emotionally Intelligent people get hired, promoted and have a sustaining presence.  The good news is EQ can be learned, developed and improved with the help of a trusted coach.  What does it take to be an emotionally intelligent HR leader?  As HR professionals, we set the tone for an emotionally intelligent culture.  Are you aware of the impact your presence has on others?

 

Liza Sichon is the founder of Executive HR Coach. She coaches executives and their teams on how they can meet their financial goals, advance their careers and live fulfilling lives.  For more information, visit her website http://executivehrcoach.com/emotional-intelligence-need/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon/.

Three reasons why you should have a career coach

Why should you have a career coach?

Career Coach Liza Sichon

How can I help your career today?

As you progress in your career, you will need to plan and strategize how you can grow with someone you can trust. What are the key learning experiences that you need to have to realize your dream career? A trained career coach will help you grow your leadership and your career.

Some of the many benefits you can get from your career coach

  1. A career coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your career coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.
  2. A career coach is a trusted confidant. You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your career coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A career coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?
  3. A career coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The career coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” A career coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

I have a new client, Daphne. She thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in a career coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

Too many good people are quitting. Ask a career coach why

Is the career coach responsible for retaining my employees?

Is it time for a career coach?

Let’s suppose I hire a career coach to develop my senior staff. Within three months, three of my staff members have resigned. What is the deal?

  • Is the career coach responsible for retaining my people?
  • Will the coach come back to me and say there’s something wrong with my environment?
  • Will my coach help me deal with my attrition?

Liza’s answer is — lets take a close look at the situation and examine the trends.  What objectives have you set for the career coach? Sometimes leaders hire a career coach for their employees’ development. In that course of development, the employee then realizes that the current company is not the kind of environment where they can flourish. They make the decision to join another company.

I also require that my clients take full responsibility for their decisions and actions. They are responsible for providing periodic updates on their progress to their boss. If employees have resigned, maybe the problem is not the people who left, maybe the problem is the boss.

Sometimes it is the culture that needs to be addressed or the leadership style of the boss.  Is the culture positive, challenging and encouraging teamwork and collaboration?  Or is the culture intense where people are constantly in fear of making mistakes or being blamed.  I like to use assessments to understand what the team culture looks like and how the leader’s behaviors impact the team. Assessments provide a platform to change.

My social media manager was a corporate trainer in downtown Chicago. He trained 1600 students how to use their desktop computers. Then one day, he realized it was no longer satisfying. He confronted a big decision. His options were a) stay in corporate training, or b) look for other opportunities. He chose option b), get another job. There was nothing wrong with his employer. He respected his boss. He liked his coworkers. He just felt a big change was necessary.

As a career coach, I help people be true to themselves and encourage them to explore opportunities that are in line with their motivations, strengths and styles.

  • Motivations are what gets you excited to jump out of bed in the morning. When you are working on things that interest and excite you, you do not track the time, you are lost in your own world. Think of a time when you just really enjoyed what you were doing.
  • Your strengths are what you are naturally good at. There is no effort on your part when you are using your natural talents, you are in the flow.
  • Your style is how others perceive you, your actions and behaviors. This is your personality as you show it to the world.

At times, your motivations, your strengths and your style are not always congruent with each other. If you are not motivated to do a certain kind of work, you may be drained or burned out easily. If you are motivated but do not have the natural talents, it takes so much effort on your part to get the work done, you are using your acquired skills, not your natural skills. And if your personality or behaviors are not consistent with your strengths, you may not be receiving projects that you want to work on. It is important to know what your natural motivations, strengths and styles are so you are in the flow and completely enjoying the work that you do.

I use valid and reliable assessments to help clients find out what their motivations, natural talents and styles are. My clients tell me that this information has been invaluable to them as they made important decisions in their careers.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

How does succession management happen at work?

When should I think about succession management?

How does succession management happen?

How does succession management happen?

Every person who has a team or direct reports needs to think about succession management. Ideally, deciding your successor should happen as soon as you get into your new job.

Early succession management has several advantages. You will be able to groom your own successors, build a stronger team overall and raise employee morale in the process. Succession management will also help you position yourself for your next promotion.

“So let’s suppose I just got promoted to VP Finance,” says Daphne. “Is one of my first tasks to figure out who will take over for me after I get the promotion?” Yes.

Succession management decisions happen under two scenarios:

During an emergency. This happens when the senior leader wins the lottery, gets very sick to perform their work or retires. We always recommend having an emergency successor, you never know when someone will win the lottery. The emergency successor keeps the team and company afloat until the long term successor is named.

There is the planned succession management. Leaders and HR decide who have the potential to be groomed for succession. The protégé may or may not know he or she is next in line. Planned succession management happens in many large companies, like Apple, Microsoft, General Motors, General Electric and Pepsico to name a few.

Should I discuss succession management openly?

  • Some companies have an open succession management policy. High potential leaders are aware that they are being developed for bigger roles.
  • There are also companies who choose to have a closed policy. People are not informed if they’re a successor or not.
  • Some companies have both strategies. They have robust development plans for a pool of successors but are not specific or are non-committal about future roles or timelines.

We see more companies are being open about succession discussions and the feedback and development plans to retain their successors. We see this happens more often in a healthy economy where employees have choices to wait for the top jobs or leave to accept the top job in another company.

It is important to highlight that succession management is not a guarantee of employment or promotion, nor is it an entitlement to coast on the job until you assume the new role.  When the moment of truth arrives, the successor needs to be considered as ready, able and capable to assume the planned role.  Sometimes personal situations of the successor change and their interest or the lifestyle of a senior level role is no longer attractive to them.  This is why we stress the value of on-going open and honest conversations and feedback.

What is your succession management strategy?  What works?

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

4 Reasons why companies bring in a career coach

Career Coach Liza Sichon

How can I help your company today?

A career coach may come into a company for a variety of reasons

  • Future growth – to enable your high potentials to grow their leadership and prepare them for larger responsibilities
  • Enhance current performance – To enable your leaders to perform their current job in the midst of change, expansion or new direction
  • Performance Improvement. Career coaches are hired when someone is derailed. Their success formula has not worked. They need a career coach to help them develop their new success formula.
  • Transition, Change or Downsizing.  At times, your employees may be suddenly in the midst of transition. They have been outplaced, outsourced, fired or some may have completely lost interest in their jobs. A career coach can help you make the most of your transition and create new opportunities for you.

Bill is the CEO of a start up company. His Board directed him to double sales within three years, with his current leadership team. “My people are great. They are surely proficient at their jobs,” he tells me. “However, I sense they are content with all that we accomplished. How do I light a fire? How do I move them out of their comfort zone without alienating them? How do I implement the changes I feel are necessary without having my best and brightest quit? I am most afraid I will fix something that is not broken. I am also afraid if I do not accomplish what the Board wants, I will be fired.”

Bill went looking for a career coach. He hired me to achieve these goals and develop his leadership team. We used a 360 leadership assessment to understand their strengths individually and as a team. They each received feedback on their own results and together we debriefed the results of the team. As a group, we worked on leadership behaviors that promote a positive working environment. They also identified areas where they can improve. It was not easy at first, there was denial, rationalization and finding blame. These reactions are normal. As soon as we got past these responses and they accepted that they needed to change, we started working on their plans. Over the past year and a half, Bill and his team evolved to be the leaders that they want to be.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

Too many good people are quitting. Ask an executive coach why

Is the executive coach responsible for retaining my employees?

man asian stressed

Let’s suppose I hire an executive coach to develop my senior staff. Within months, 3 of my staff members have resigned. What is the deal?

  • Is this something I should expect?
  • Will the coach come back to me and say there’s something wrong with my environment?
  • Will my coach help me deal with my attrition?

 

Liza’s answer is — lets take a close look at the situation and examine the trends.  What objectives have you set for the executive coach? Sometimes leaders hire an executive coach for their employees’ development. In that course of development, the employee then realizes that the current company is not the kind of environment where they can flourish. They make the decision to join another company.

 

 

I also require that my clients take full responsibility for their decisions and actions. They are responsible for providing periodic updates on their progress to their boss. If employees have resigned, maybe the problem is not the people who left, maybe the problem is the boss.

 

Sometimes it is the culture that needs to be addressed or the leadership style of the boss.  Is the culture positive, challenging and encouraging teamwork and collaboration?  Or is the culture intense where people are constantly in fear of making mistakes or being blamed.  I like to use assessments to understand what the team culture looks like and how the leader’s behaviors impact the team. Assessments provide a platform to change.

 

My social media manager was a corporate trainer in downtown Chicago. He trained 1600 students how to use their desktop computers. Then one day, he realized it was no longer satisfying. He confronted a big decision. His options were a) stay in corporate training, or b) look for other opportunities. He chose option b), get another job. There was nothing wrong with his employer. He respected his boss. He liked his coworkers. He just felt a big change was necessary.

 

As an executive coach, I help people be true to themselves and encourage them to explore opportunities that are in line with their motivations, strengths and styles.

  • Motivations are what gets you excited to jump out of bed in the morning. When you are working on things that interest and excite you, you do not track the time, you are lost in your own world. Think of a time when you just really enjoyed what you were doing.
  • Your strengths are what you are naturally good at. There is no effort on your part when you are using your natural talents, you are in the flow.
  • Your style is how others perceive you, your actions and behaviors. This is your personality as you show it to the world.

 

At times, your motivations, your strengths and your style are not always congruent with each other. If you are not motivated to do a certain kind of work, you may be drained or burned out easily. If you are motivated but do not have the natural talents, it takes so much effort on your part to get the work done, you are using your acquired skills, not your natural skills. And if your personality or behaviors are not consistent with your strengths, you may not be receiving projects that you want to work on. It is important to know what your natural motivations, strengths and styles are so you are in the flow and completely enjoying the work that you do.

 

I use valid and reliable assessments to help clients find out what their motivations, natural talents and styles are. My clients tell me that this information has been invaluable to them as they made important decisions in their careers. For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/executive-coach-yes/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

4 Reasons why companies bring in an executive coach

Executive Coach Liza Sichon

How can I help your company today?

An executive coach may come into a company for a variety of reasons

  • Future growth – to enable your high potentials to grow their leadership and prepare them for larger responsibilities
  • Enhance current performance – To enable your leaders to perform their current job in the midst of change, expansion or new direction
  • Performance Improvement. Coaches are hired when someone is derailed. Their success formula has not worked and they need a coach to help them develop their new success formula.
  • Transition, Change or Downsizing.  At times, your employees may be suddenly in the midst of transition. They have been outplaced, outsourced, fired or some may have completely lost interest in their jobs. An executive coach can help you make the most of your transition and create new opportunities for you.

Bill is the CEO of a $75 Million company. His Board directed him to reach $100 Million in sales within three years, with his current leadership team. “My people are great. They are surely proficient at their jobs,” he tells me. “However, I sense they are content. How do I light a fire or move them out of their comfort zone without alienating them? How do I implement the changes I feel are necessary without having my best and brightest quit? I am most afraid I will fix something that is not broken. I am afraid if I do not accomplish what the Board wants, I will be fired.”

Bill hired me to achieve these goals and develop his leadership team. We used a 360 leadership assessment to understand their strengths individually and as a team. They each received feedback on their own results and together we debriefed the results of the team. As a group, we worked on leadership behaviors that promote a positive working environment. They also identified areas where they can improve. It was not easy at first, there was denial, rationalization and finding blame. These reactions are normal. As soon as we got past these responses and they accepted that they needed to change, we started working on their plans. Over the past year and a half, Bill and his team evolved to be the leaders that they want to be.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/executive-coach-yes/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

Three reasons why you should have an executive coach

Why should you have an executive coach?

Executive Coach Liza Sichon

How can I help your career today?

As you progress in your career, you will need to plan and strategize how you can grow with someone you can trust. What are the key learning experiences that you need to have to get you to your dream career? A trained executive coach will help you grow your leadership and your career.

Some of the many benefits you can get from your coach

An executive coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.

You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your executive coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?

An executive coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” An executive coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

I have a new client, Daphne. She thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in an executive coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/executive-coach-yes/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

How Emotionally Intelligent are you?

women smilingI had lunch with my assistant before I left my corporate world.  She is fabulous and the best I ever had, I love her.  She smilingly asked me if I remember what I said to her when she told me a couple of months ago that she needed surgery.  I honestly did not remember what I said to her.  She helped me recall that the first thing I said was to request for the calendar.  We looked at how many days she was going to take off, when that would be and how the work can be handled while she was gone.  That was my first impulse, first thing I said!.  Of course, I cared about her, but I was more focused on the task.  To this day, I am so embarrassed about my behavior, I commit to be more sensitive to others in my relationships, but that time, I did not know how.  In hindsight, I knew that at that moment, I lacked empathy and was totally unaware.

Dr. Relly Nadler and I had a wonderful time facilitating our workshop: Leading with Emotional Intelligence for the HR Professional at the San Francisco office of SHRM (Society of Human Resources Management).   As a recovered task focused, hard charging HR refugee, I had fun teaching the concepts of Emotional Intelligence with our participants.  Here are some take-aways from the workshop:

1. One aspect of Emotional Intelligence is about being aware of your thoughts and feelings in the moment.  When you are in the midst of a debate or argument, or under a tight deadline, what do you do?  You may opt to continue to work just to get the task done.  The emotionally intelligent person will know when to take a high quality break.  Yes, the quality of the break matters. How can you best relieve your body and mind of stress that could drop your decision-making ability and IQ points?  Take a brief walk around the block, journal your thoughts and feelings or talk to a trusted friend for at least 20 minutes, then go back to the task at hand.  Sitting in the couch watching TV or reaching for that candy bar will not improve your EQ and will make you sluggish when you get back to work, dropping IQ points.

2. Honestly think about your relationship with your boss.  A Hay study found out that 50% of life satisfaction comes from your relationship with your boss and 75% of employees say that dealing with their boss is the most stressful part of their day.  If you do not have a good relationship  with your boss or if you are in denial about how bad your relationship is with your boss, you may be losing IQ and EQ points that affect your work or may be getting sick without you knowing it.  Find out what you can do to improve this relationship, if all else fails, find another job.

3. The good news about Emotional Intelligence is that it can be learned and improved, unlike IQ which is set.  It is never too late to improve your relationships at work and at home.  The first place to start is not to focus on other people’s short comings, but with yourself. Participants in the workshop took the Nadler EI self assessment and were paired with peer coaches to focus on at least two strengths to leverage and potential derailers.  The participants created an action plan to develop their EQ.

Emotions are like the flu, they are contagious.  Just watch your boss’ emotions and it travels like wildfire.  Leaders underestimate the impact they have on people. It is not just their decision-making and analytical ability that impacts the team, it is also their emotions. As a leader, how much emotional self-control, self-awareness and relationship investment capital do you have with your co-workers and team members?    How do you increase this to be at the top of your game?

Liza Sichon is an Executive Coach, Speaker and HR Consultant located in Silicon Valley.  Visit her website at http://executivehrcoach.com

 

 

 

 

 

Assessing, Developing and Retaining Effective Global Leaders presentation to The Conference Board

May 30, 2014 San Diego, California. Executive HR Coach, LLC, is pleased to announce Managing Director, Liza Sichon will be presenting Assessing, Developing and Retaining Effective Global Leaders at the Conference Board’s Leadership Development Conference in San Diego on June 3, 2014. The presentation will benefit those who need to develop succession plans at their corporations. After attending Liza Sichon’s presentation, attendees will know:

  • How to identify, assess and develop your talent pipeline.
  • How to implement a succession plan that aligns with your organization’s growth strategy.
  • How other companies have wrestled with and implemented succession plans.

The Conference Board works within and across three main subject areas – Corporate Leadership; Economy & Business Environment; and Human Capital – to create a unique, enterprise-wide perspective that helps business leaders respond today, anticipate tomorrow, and make the right strategic decisions every day.

The Conference Board provides:

  • Objective, world-renowned economic data and analyses that help business and policy leaders make sense of their operating environments.
  • In-depth research and best practices concerning management, leadership, and corporate citizenship.
  • Public and private forums in which executives learn with and from their peers.
Liza Sichon to speak on developing effective global leaders

Liza Sichon to speak on assessing, developing and retaining effective global leaders June 3

The Conference Board’s Leadership Development Conference is occurring June 3-5, 2014 at the Coronado Island Marriott, San Diego. Interested parties can call (212) 339-0345 or visit Conference Board.

Liza Sichon is the Managing Director of Executive HR Coach, LLC, a Silicon-valley based human resource and career consultancy will speak on retaining effective global leaders. Liza is an experienced executive coach, notable speaker, and global HR consultant with over twenty years of corporate experience working for large, multi-national firms. Originally from the Philippines, and now based in Silicon Valley, California, Liza held global HR positions across the Americas, EMEA, Asia Pacific and Latin America.

Most recently, Liza served as the Vice President HR Transformation, Communications and Operations for Hewlett Packard’s global HR function, serving 2,400 HR professionals. Prior to this, Liza worked for Avaya as the Vice President HR International & Mergers and Acquisitions for various profit centers in Americas, Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America. In this role, she was responsible for HR strategy and global operations for over 30 countries outside the US. Liza also held HR leadership roles at Corning Life Sciences in New Jersey, Citibank in New York, and Anscor Corporation in the Philippines.

Liza is known for her broad business orientation and deep working knowledge of global leadership. She has extensive coaching experience and is an expert on talent management and career navigation. Additionally, her career included extensive speaking engagements to diverse global audiences as well as notable universities such as the Harvard MBA Women’s Conference. She is a sought after motivational speaker sharing her insights in the areas of career success for women, the benefits of executive coaching, HR transformation, and developing global talent. Executive HR Coach can be reached at (408) 217-9074 and http://executivehrcoach.com.

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Why Hire a coach?

Top Reasons Coaches are Engaged:

(HBR Jan 2009)

    • Develop high potentials or facilitate transition: 48%
    • Act as a sounding board: 26%
    • Address derailing behavior: 12%