Careers

Leading Effectively with Emotional Intelligence for the HR Professional

NCHRA LogoSAN JOSE, CA. — Executive HR Coach, LLC, is pleased to announce Managing Director, Liza Sichon will be presenting Leading Effectively with Emotional Intelligence at the NCHRA Training Center on June 18, 2014 along with Dr. Relly Nadler. Participants will learn how being aware of your own emotional intelligence improves your decision making ability and drives your leadership performance forward, key components needed by successful HR professionals.

Key takeaways include:

  • Assess your own emotional style using the Nadler EI Star Profile
  • Apply emotional intelligence skills and tools in your own work environment
  • Create a personal development plan to improve your emotional intelligence
  • Develop an action plan with specific steps to implement immediately
  • 5 Strategic/General Recertification Credits.

“Emotional Intelligence or EQ is ability to manage from the head and from the heart in its simplest terms,” says presenter Liza Sichon. “There are four areas of emotional intelligence: Self Awareness, Self Management, Social Awareness and Relationship Management. This joint interactive workshop presentation by Sichon and Nadler will include an assessment of your own emotional intelligence using the Nadler EI Self Assessment.”

Participants will leave the conference with a thorough understanding of how to apply these strategies in the workplace.

Liza Sichon is the Managing Director of Executive HR Coach, LLC, a Silicon-valley based human resource and career consultancy will speak on attracting, developing and retaining effective global leaders. Liza is an experienced executive coach, notable speaker, and global HR consultant with over twenty years of corporate experience working for large, multi-national firms. Originally from the Philippines, and now based in Silicon Valley, California, Liza held global HR positions across the Americas, EMEA, Asia Pacific and Latin America.

Most recently, Liza served as the Vice President HR Transformation, Communications and Operations for Hewlett Packard’s global HR function, serving 2,400 HR professionals. Prior to this, Liza worked for Avaya as the Vice President HR International & Mergers and Acquisitions for various profit centers in Americas, Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America. In this role, she was responsible for HR strategy and global operations for over 30 countries outside the US. Liza also held HR leadership roles at Corning Life Sciences in New Jersey, Citibank in New York, and Anscor Corporation in the Philippines.

Liza is known for her broad business orientation and deep working knowledge of global leadership. She has extensive coaching experience and is an expert on talent management and career navigation. Additionally, her career included extensive speaking engagements to diverse global audiences as well as notable universities such as the Harvard MBA Women’s Conference.

She is a sought after motivational speaker sharing her insights in the areas of career success for women, the benefits of executive coaching, HR transformation, and developing global talent. Executive HR Coach can be reached at (408) 217-9074 and http://executivehrcoach.com.

This workshop will occur at the NCHRA Training Center, 233 Sansome Street, Suite 508, San Francisco, CA 94104. Online registration is available at NCHRA.

5 Interview Questions for Global Assignments

jon interview1How do you select the right leaders for global roles?  Local success does not necessarily guarantee global success. What are the red flags that could potentially lead to a global misfit?  Selecting talent who will eventually succeed in global roles is a major responsibility and can be daunting for the inexperienced global talent manager.

Here are 5 sample interview questions that could give you a broad and deep perspective of your global candidate, regardless of host country.

1. What was your most difficult or complicated problem or situation that you have handled? How did you handle it and what was the result?  This question can reveal insights to a person’s ability to handle ambiguity, complexity, surprises and differences. Effective leaders are not threatened or paralyzed by new or complex situations.  In fact, they are energized and challenged when the unexpected occurs.

 

2. How do you select members of your team? What do you look for and how what do you avoid?  This question leads to the leader’s ability to promote the success of their team, both with each other and with their local and cross cultural team members. Look for exceptional listening skills and openness to ideas other than their own.

 

3. Tell me about an incident where you had to adjust a global policy to an organizational procedure that was in conflict with local practices.   How did you handle it?  This refers to a leader’s ability to understand perspectives other than one’s own or integrate multiple viewpoints to creatively arrive at a win win solution.

 

4. How do you reward the members of your team?   Probe for customization vs one size fits all rewards and recognition.  A successful global leader seeks multiple points of views, anticipates differences and act in consideration to others needs.

 

5. How have you prepared your successor?  Successful global leaders are personally engaged in developing their people through multiple approaches.

 

Interested in learning more about how to successfully select, plan for and develop global talent?  Join us at the 20th Annual Leadership Development Conference of the Conference Board on June 3-5 in San Diego, CA.  For the Agenda, see Global Leaders . To register, visit the sign up page.

Where is your organization in the global maturity curve?

global assignment– Your company has just expanded globally

– You want to apply for a global role but you do not have the experience

– You have just been selected for a global assignment, but are unsure about your own capabilities

You may be experiencing these or similar apprehensions about being a global leader, but you do not need to be concerned.  Join a select group of leaders at the 20th Annual Leadership Development Conference of the Conference Board on June 3-5 in San Diego, CA 

The Succession Management Pre Conference will help you:

  • Learn a global assessment tool to identify and develop high potential talent
  • Understand where your company is on the global organizational maturity curve
  • Identify tools and techniques to build your succession plans

For the Agenda, see Global Leaders . To register, visit the sign up page.

We look forward to seeing you.

 

What is Your Global Acumen?

Global HR Academy

Have you ever wondered how effective you are as a global leader?

What are the key competencies you need to have to be successful in your global assignment?

How do you identify, attract and retain your global talent pool?

Are you ready to take your global leadership to the next level?  Join us with a select group of leaders at the 20th Leadership Development Conference of The Conference Board on June 3-5 in San Diego

At the Succession Management Pre Conference on June 3,  you will learn how to:

  • Recognize, assess, and select talent global talent
  • Analyze and refine your development practices in light of global demands
  • Develop a network of senior professionals who are addressing similar challenges

To learn more about the Conference, please visit our website https://www.conference-board.org/conferences/conferencedetail.cfm?conferenceid=2609

 

 

Invitation: The Global HR Leaders Academy

The Global HR Leaders AcademyHR Colleagues:

Wondering how to take your career to the next level?  Want to ensure you are prepared to take on broader global responsibilities? Join a small cohort of colleagues across diverse industries and  a practitioner faculty that will deepen your acumen, broaden your network, and prepare you for expanded responsibility in your organization on June 9-12 at the Conference Board in New York City.

The Conference Board’s Global HR Leaders Academy welcomes experienced, mid to senior-level HR leaders with growing global responsibilities. Led by an expert faculty in a small group environment, the Global HR Academy experience includes:

  • A personal, confidential assessment of your current global capability using the Trans-Global Leadership Assessment
  • A 3-day intensive learning experience, coupled with pre-and post-event webcasts
  • Simulations, interactive case studies with experienced practitioners from leading companies, individualized coaching and a personalized action plan
  • Tools and techniques to help move your organization’s HR capability up the maturity curve
  • Global HR Leader Certification and 13.5 HRCI credits

To learn more about the Academy, click here. https://www.conference-board.org/globalhrleadersacademy/

We are offering a one time special rate of $2,500 for the June cohort only.  To avail of the discount, contact Fana Tekle at fana.tekle@conferenceboard.org or 212.339.0210 and mention this posting from me.

We look forward to welcoming you to the Academy.

 

Job Search Tips for Graduates

graduatesWith graduation coming up, it’s that time of the year when I receive requests from moms to coach their graduates with their job search. Some basic questions like in what city do you want to work or what industry do you want to work in are not as firm in the new graduates minds as their parents would like it to be.  Therefore discussions on what to do after college becomes a frustrating conversation between parents and their kids who are really confused after spending four years or so in an expensive college.

Below is an excerpt of my conversation with Alexi, a very proactive, smart and coachable college graduate job searcher.  If you are a recent college graduate and looking to get on the job search track, here are some thoughts to get you started:

1. What kind of job do you envision yourself doing in your 30s and in your 40s?.  If you don’t know, don’t worry.  If you do, good for you.  Research or work with a career coach or your guidance counselor to find out entry-level jobs in your field.
2. Have you taken a career assessment that gives you some general direction on how you may apply your natural skills and talents?  If not, I recommend the Ucipher graduate assessment.  It is an on-line tool that provides insight into your strengths and roles that match who you are.  It is also easy to interpret. You can  access the tool by clicking here – http://www.uciphergraduate.com/assessment.aspx
3. My friend, Dana Manciagli,  recently wrote a book – Cut the Crap and Get a Job.  You can look her up on Linked In and Facebook or buy the book at Amazon.  She has lots of tips for the job searcher.  Read the book and incorporate her advice that makes sense to you.
4. Are you open to relocation?  If so, start looking at jobs in your desired location.
5. Are you subscribed to job boards like Indeed or Monster?  Suggest you choose companies that you want to work on and research on the kinds of jobs that they have along your lines of interest.
6. Is your Linked In profile updated?  If not, create a professional one.  There are lots of jobs posted in Linked In.  Add your resume to your Linked In profile with a nice professional picture that shows your face.  Sign up for job leads in your areas of interest.  Start networking and connecting with friends, former teachers, neighbors, club members etc on Linked In.
Alexi wanted to know if he should remain anonymous in Linked In since he is job searching.  I disagreed.  Looking for an entry-level job after college and viewing career information is not something to hide or be ashamed of.
7. Set goals.  Decide how many applications you will send out or how many contacts you will reach out in a day and make this your priority above all else.
8. Lastly, know that finding a job is a full-time job.  Invest in it and treat it like a special project. Do not be discouraged by the rejections or lack of communication from companies.  Keep a positive attitude – you only need one great job offer, the more rejections, the closer you will be to your job.
But first, we need to figure out what kind of jobs you are interested in applying, then we can tailor your resume to the job and start applying.  It takes a couple of months to get into the swing of a job search.  The perfect job is just waiting for you out there.
Alexi is a terrific coachee.  He took  the assessment and  career advise and asked very good questions.  I have no doubt that he will be finding his perfect job in no time.

 

Why HR professionals think they do not need a coach

woman executiving talkingI had a conversation with an HR Executive recently about her business leader who needs an Executive Coach.  In the process of our conversation, she realized that she also wanted to have her own coach.  But she is hesitant to hire one.

Why is it that HR professionals quickly diagnose when a situation needs coaching but rarely do they raise their hands to ask for their own coach? Here are some reasons:

1. They may be embarrassed to admit that they cannot resolve their own leadership gaps?

2. They are used to solving other people’s problems, and are hesitant to face their own?

3. They do not think they deserve to have their own coach.  We are conditioned to being viewed as an expense.

4. They don’t want to call attention to themselves or be viewed as having a “problem”.  To the unenlightened, having a coach was traditionally  and incorrectly viewed as being a failure.

During the course of our conversation, I offered to coach her.  She was very thankful for the coaching conversation.  She is sharp, energetic and strategic but suffered from having everything in her head.  Talking through her options and choices empowered and refreshed her.  She became clearer on her course of action.

Working through issues with my coach have been some of the most powerful dialogues I’ve had in my career.  The answers have always been within me, I just needed a trusted advisor and partner to work through my options without judgement.

If you  need to work through certain choices, or are in the midst of transition or change, feel stuck or overwhelmed, work it through with a trained executive coach or email me at liza@executivehrcoach.com for a complimentary session.

I wish my team members got along better.

sociomap_samIf only my team members would talk to each other.  I don’t need to get involved in their own squabbles, they should just talk it out. I’ll just ignore it and hope that it will go away.

I have heard these statements from my clients.  They know that there is conflict within their team, they feel it, but they are reluctant to address it.  They are tired of playing referee or parent. They know that certain members of their teams do not work at maximum effectiveness. Individually, these team members are excellent contributors, they achieve results.  But ask them to work together and its a battlefield.

Usually the team leader ends up frustrated and drained when this situation happens. It is emotional and a waste of time. It doesn’t need to be.

Using Sociomapping® techniques, leaders can visualize the level of communication, decision-making, teaming, and cooperation within the teams. Through open and honest dialogue, with the help of a trained executive coach, sociomapping® provides a safe and non-threatening picture of the levels of collaboration with the team.

Sociomapping® has been around for over 20 years and most recently received the Innovation Award 2012 at the 24th IIAS International Conference for significant contribution to the field of sociodiagnostics.

Over the last 20 years Sociomapping® has been used in the research of communication of small groups operating in extreme situations like simulation of space flights or combat units. The process of group mapping has been also pioneered in Army units operating abroad in foreign missions. In 2008, Sociomapping® methods started to be used in commercial areas for mapping of management teams of multinational organizations.

Tired of working in a dysfunctional team? Are you ready to take your team performance to new heights, maximize the contribution of every team member and build synergies and positive collaboration among your team members?  Take your leadership and your career to the next level and build team effectiveness as a competitive advantage.  Contact me at liza@executivehrcoach.com or visit www.sociomap.com to learn more about the benefits of Sociomapping®.

 

 

Define Your Non-negotiables Part 3: Career Flexibility

work life balanceWe have been discussing the importance of setting priorities and non-negotiables for work life success.  Having a set of priorities helps us make choices.  Being clear with our non-negotiables, free us from stress and indecision.  We realign our priorities as our lives and needs change.

An important non-negotiable for high achieving women is career flexibility.  This is the ability to be fully present at home when needed while having a career that supports your personal needs.

Georgia Smith, corporate executive and one of the women I interviewed for my forthcoming book – You Can Be It All, Secrets of High Achieving Women (current working title), was able to achieve career flexibility, working full time while raising her son.

Georgia always knew that she was going to be a working mom even before she got married.  Georgia and her husband discussed what they would be willing to do for each other’s career and where they will live.  While her husband was raised in the East Coast,USA, his preference is to work and live in the West Coast. They knew that they may have to pass up advancement opportunities by making this decision.  Georgia did not regret this decision. She knew that she would forego  making a lot more money and would take longer to get to executive ranks, but it was more important to her that she felt good about the positive contribution that she was making at work, still made good money and lived comfortably close to her extended family.  The ego was probably the only thing impacted by these non-negotiables and this was not an issue with her.

When she had her son, she had the classic struggle of all working women: “How can I be a full-time mom and a full-time professional and give everything needed to both, without short changing either?”.  Her husband traveled most of the time, so balancing childcare and her own career demands rested primarily on her.  She was fortunate to be able to explore different roles within a company that recognized her skills and potential.  When she  wanted to have flexible hours, she decided to stay in the same company and changed  to field work.

Georgia’s non negotiable is career flexibility. While her son was young, she benefited from a flexible schedule on the road as a Sales Account Manager. She had the ability to be in the field and would take the time to watch her son’s sporting events.  As her son moved to high school, she decided to finish her college education.  They had dinner together every night to catch up on their day and studied together after dinner.  As her son moved on to college she shifted to a regional role and was able to do more travel.

She considers herself fortunate to be have a career that met her personal needs and did not give anybody less than they deserved.  Her son is now an accomplished lawyer with his own family and never felt short-changed having a full-time working mom.  He remembers that she was with him for all the important moments in his life.  

Georgia’s non-negotiable, career flexibility, enabled her to be the best mom that she can be while achieving career success.  Georgia is a high achieving woman.  Do you know a high achieving woman?  What is she doing?  What is your non-negotiable and how has it served your needs?

 

4 Ways to Prepare for Your Career Conversation.

young employee meeting w managerMy client is ready to move to another role within the company after only a year in the job.  Although there continues to be a lot of valuable work sent her way, she feels that she is not learning anything new; she is not challenged.  She is concerned about bringing up the topic to her manager, someone she greatly respects. She wants to stay in the company, in her current location, but she is ready for something new.  Here is how we prepared for this conversation.

1. Do your homework before you meet with your manager.  Figure out your bigger picture, where do you see your career 5 to 10 years from now?  This is not an easy exercise; you may need to take a couple of weeks or even months to figure this out.  It does not need to be accurate and perfect, you can tweak and update your vision along the way.  The long-term career vision is critical to help you decide on new skills and experiences you will need. My client sees a few possibilities in her career: Country HR Manager, Vice President Human Resources of a business unit, Corporate Human Resources role in headquarters.

2. When you have this picture in mind, figure out the relevant skills and experiences that you need to acquire to get you there.  My client has developed strong analytical and financial skills over the past 10 years and has a master’s degree in Human Resources.  Due to her strengths, she continues to be tapped for similar planning and analysis roles. She would like be in other areas of HR: talent management, business partnering and organizational development to round-up her portfolio.  She will review specific roles with her manager and seek guidance on how to acquire these competencies for current and future roles.

3. Have a transition plan and timeline in mind.  She has a rough idea of how work will get done when she transitions into a new role; she also has a timeline.  While these are not definite, your proactiveness will relieve your manager’s initial concerns about backfilling your responsibilities.

4. Be confident and ask for what you need.  You will be surprised how helpful and supportive your manager can be once you share your career plans and request for specific assignments.

Your career journey is as important, fulfilling and fun as achieving your career goals.  While keeping the end state in mind, be flexible and welcome the occasional twists and turns that may come your way.  These are opportunities for you to consider and don’t be afraid to step into unknown open doors or knock on new interesting ones.

Through our coaching conversation, my client became more prepared and confident to speak to her manager.  I am so excited for her and can’t wait for our next coaching call.

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Why Hire a coach?

Top Reasons Coaches are Engaged:

(HBR Jan 2009)

    • Develop high potentials or facilitate transition: 48%
    • Act as a sounding board: 26%
    • Address derailing behavior: 12%