Executive Coaching

Why bother getting a career coach? I’m doing just fine, I think.

Why should you get a career coach in the first place?

Career Coach Liza Sichon

How can Liza Sichon help your career today?

As you progress in your career, you will need to plan and strategize how you can grow with someone you can trust. What are the key learning experiences that you need to have to realize your dream career? A trained career coach will help you grow your leadership and your career.

Three benefits you will realize from your career coach

  • A career coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your career coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.
  • A career coach is a trusted confidant. You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your career coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A career coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?
  • A career coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The career coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” A career coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

The sky is the limit for Daphne

I have a new client, Daphne. She thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in a career coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

I need this overseas assignment to work. Do I need an expat coach?

“I am going on an expat assignment.  What do I need to know?”

Global leader on an expat assignment

Global leader on an expat assignment

Being an expat global can be overwhelming, with many moving parts and critical priorities that all need your attention. A lot is at stake. You feel the pressure to produce. You may be constantly jet lagged due to travel and late night conference calls. You do not want to disappoint your bosses and you certainly want to ensure your family’s happiness and well-being while away from home.

 

In order to ensure that you are successful in your ex-pat role, there are a few items that need to be top on your priority list.

 

  1. Be clear with your stakeholders on the goals & objectives of your assignment. How will your success be measured, how quickly does your boss expect to see these results
  2. Decision Making – As an ex-pat, you are going to make several decisions, some simultaneously, some urgent, some without all the information that you need.  What decisions do you need to run by headquarters and which decisions are you empowered to make.
  3. Team – ensure that you have the best team in place or move quickly to have the right people. You will heavily depend on your local team and you need to be able to trust them.
  4. Communications – what is the frequency and method of communicating back to HQ and how often do you need to provide updates? This is where most ex-pats get frustrated. Agree upfront with your bosses on how to proactively connect with each other.
  5. Cultural and Language training – do not pass up the opportunity to learn about the cultural nuances and local language of your host country. Many ex pats feel that this is not necessary and pass this up. Local language is generally more of a necessity for day to day living than it is in the office since most business conversations are conducted in English.
  6. Global leadership development and ex-pat coaching – Cultural and language training is not enough. In order to be effective, you need to acquire new leadership skills that will help you succeed in a global multi-cultural & multi-lingual environments. Our Transglobal Leadership TM workshop (Sharkey, Cooke et al) can be customized to your needs. It includes an extensive 360 assessment of your global readiness, strengths and areas of development; ex pat coaching and a strategic action plan for your first 100 days. We do an individual customized program or a group program tailored to your company’s needs. My ex pat coach in Belgium was a life saver who eventually became a close family friend. I confided in him and his insights and advice have been invaluable. Please contact me for more information.

Content from http://executivehrcoach.com/global-leaders-born-made/ and http://linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

Three reasons why you should have a career coach

Why should you have a career coach?

Career Coach Liza Sichon

How can I help your career today?

As you progress in your career, you will need to plan and strategize how you can grow with someone you can trust. What are the key learning experiences that you need to have to realize your dream career? A trained career coach will help you grow your leadership and your career.

Some of the many benefits you can get from your career coach

  1. A career coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your career coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.
  2. A career coach is a trusted confidant. You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your career coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A career coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?
  3. A career coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The career coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” A career coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

I have a new client, Daphne. She thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in a career coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

Too many good people are quitting. Ask a career coach why

Is the career coach responsible for retaining my employees?

Is it time for a career coach?

Let’s suppose I hire a career coach to develop my senior staff. Within three months, three of my staff members have resigned. What is the deal?

  • Is the career coach responsible for retaining my people?
  • Will the coach come back to me and say there’s something wrong with my environment?
  • Will my coach help me deal with my attrition?

Liza’s answer is — lets take a close look at the situation and examine the trends.  What objectives have you set for the career coach? Sometimes leaders hire a career coach for their employees’ development. In that course of development, the employee then realizes that the current company is not the kind of environment where they can flourish. They make the decision to join another company.

I also require that my clients take full responsibility for their decisions and actions. They are responsible for providing periodic updates on their progress to their boss. If employees have resigned, maybe the problem is not the people who left, maybe the problem is the boss.

Sometimes it is the culture that needs to be addressed or the leadership style of the boss.  Is the culture positive, challenging and encouraging teamwork and collaboration?  Or is the culture intense where people are constantly in fear of making mistakes or being blamed.  I like to use assessments to understand what the team culture looks like and how the leader’s behaviors impact the team. Assessments provide a platform to change.

My social media manager was a corporate trainer in downtown Chicago. He trained 1600 students how to use their desktop computers. Then one day, he realized it was no longer satisfying. He confronted a big decision. His options were a) stay in corporate training, or b) look for other opportunities. He chose option b), get another job. There was nothing wrong with his employer. He respected his boss. He liked his coworkers. He just felt a big change was necessary.

As a career coach, I help people be true to themselves and encourage them to explore opportunities that are in line with their motivations, strengths and styles.

  • Motivations are what gets you excited to jump out of bed in the morning. When you are working on things that interest and excite you, you do not track the time, you are lost in your own world. Think of a time when you just really enjoyed what you were doing.
  • Your strengths are what you are naturally good at. There is no effort on your part when you are using your natural talents, you are in the flow.
  • Your style is how others perceive you, your actions and behaviors. This is your personality as you show it to the world.

At times, your motivations, your strengths and your style are not always congruent with each other. If you are not motivated to do a certain kind of work, you may be drained or burned out easily. If you are motivated but do not have the natural talents, it takes so much effort on your part to get the work done, you are using your acquired skills, not your natural skills. And if your personality or behaviors are not consistent with your strengths, you may not be receiving projects that you want to work on. It is important to know what your natural motivations, strengths and styles are so you are in the flow and completely enjoying the work that you do.

I use valid and reliable assessments to help clients find out what their motivations, natural talents and styles are. My clients tell me that this information has been invaluable to them as they made important decisions in their careers.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

4 Reasons why companies bring in a career coach

Career Coach Liza Sichon

How can I help your company today?

A career coach may come into a company for a variety of reasons

  • Future growth – to enable your high potentials to grow their leadership and prepare them for larger responsibilities
  • Enhance current performance – To enable your leaders to perform their current job in the midst of change, expansion or new direction
  • Performance Improvement. Career coaches are hired when someone is derailed. Their success formula has not worked. They need a career coach to help them develop their new success formula.
  • Transition, Change or Downsizing.  At times, your employees may be suddenly in the midst of transition. They have been outplaced, outsourced, fired or some may have completely lost interest in their jobs. A career coach can help you make the most of your transition and create new opportunities for you.

Bill is the CEO of a start up company. His Board directed him to double sales within three years, with his current leadership team. “My people are great. They are surely proficient at their jobs,” he tells me. “However, I sense they are content with all that we accomplished. How do I light a fire? How do I move them out of their comfort zone without alienating them? How do I implement the changes I feel are necessary without having my best and brightest quit? I am most afraid I will fix something that is not broken. I am also afraid if I do not accomplish what the Board wants, I will be fired.”

Bill went looking for a career coach. He hired me to achieve these goals and develop his leadership team. We used a 360 leadership assessment to understand their strengths individually and as a team. They each received feedback on their own results and together we debriefed the results of the team. As a group, we worked on leadership behaviors that promote a positive working environment. They also identified areas where they can improve. It was not easy at first, there was denial, rationalization and finding blame. These reactions are normal. As soon as we got past these responses and they accepted that they needed to change, we started working on their plans. Over the past year and a half, Bill and his team evolved to be the leaders that they want to be.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/career-coach-need-one/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

Too many good people are quitting. Ask an executive coach why

Is the executive coach responsible for retaining my employees?

man asian stressed

Let’s suppose I hire an executive coach to develop my senior staff. Within months, 3 of my staff members have resigned. What is the deal?

  • Is this something I should expect?
  • Will the coach come back to me and say there’s something wrong with my environment?
  • Will my coach help me deal with my attrition?

 

Liza’s answer is — lets take a close look at the situation and examine the trends.  What objectives have you set for the executive coach? Sometimes leaders hire an executive coach for their employees’ development. In that course of development, the employee then realizes that the current company is not the kind of environment where they can flourish. They make the decision to join another company.

 

 

I also require that my clients take full responsibility for their decisions and actions. They are responsible for providing periodic updates on their progress to their boss. If employees have resigned, maybe the problem is not the people who left, maybe the problem is the boss.

 

Sometimes it is the culture that needs to be addressed or the leadership style of the boss.  Is the culture positive, challenging and encouraging teamwork and collaboration?  Or is the culture intense where people are constantly in fear of making mistakes or being blamed.  I like to use assessments to understand what the team culture looks like and how the leader’s behaviors impact the team. Assessments provide a platform to change.

 

My social media manager was a corporate trainer in downtown Chicago. He trained 1600 students how to use their desktop computers. Then one day, he realized it was no longer satisfying. He confronted a big decision. His options were a) stay in corporate training, or b) look for other opportunities. He chose option b), get another job. There was nothing wrong with his employer. He respected his boss. He liked his coworkers. He just felt a big change was necessary.

 

As an executive coach, I help people be true to themselves and encourage them to explore opportunities that are in line with their motivations, strengths and styles.

  • Motivations are what gets you excited to jump out of bed in the morning. When you are working on things that interest and excite you, you do not track the time, you are lost in your own world. Think of a time when you just really enjoyed what you were doing.
  • Your strengths are what you are naturally good at. There is no effort on your part when you are using your natural talents, you are in the flow.
  • Your style is how others perceive you, your actions and behaviors. This is your personality as you show it to the world.

 

At times, your motivations, your strengths and your style are not always congruent with each other. If you are not motivated to do a certain kind of work, you may be drained or burned out easily. If you are motivated but do not have the natural talents, it takes so much effort on your part to get the work done, you are using your acquired skills, not your natural skills. And if your personality or behaviors are not consistent with your strengths, you may not be receiving projects that you want to work on. It is important to know what your natural motivations, strengths and styles are so you are in the flow and completely enjoying the work that you do.

 

I use valid and reliable assessments to help clients find out what their motivations, natural talents and styles are. My clients tell me that this information has been invaluable to them as they made important decisions in their careers. For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/executive-coach-yes/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

4 Reasons why companies bring in an executive coach

Executive Coach Liza Sichon

How can I help your company today?

An executive coach may come into a company for a variety of reasons

  • Future growth – to enable your high potentials to grow their leadership and prepare them for larger responsibilities
  • Enhance current performance – To enable your leaders to perform their current job in the midst of change, expansion or new direction
  • Performance Improvement. Coaches are hired when someone is derailed. Their success formula has not worked and they need a coach to help them develop their new success formula.
  • Transition, Change or Downsizing.  At times, your employees may be suddenly in the midst of transition. They have been outplaced, outsourced, fired or some may have completely lost interest in their jobs. An executive coach can help you make the most of your transition and create new opportunities for you.

Bill is the CEO of a $75 Million company. His Board directed him to reach $100 Million in sales within three years, with his current leadership team. “My people are great. They are surely proficient at their jobs,” he tells me. “However, I sense they are content. How do I light a fire or move them out of their comfort zone without alienating them? How do I implement the changes I feel are necessary without having my best and brightest quit? I am most afraid I will fix something that is not broken. I am afraid if I do not accomplish what the Board wants, I will be fired.”

Bill hired me to achieve these goals and develop his leadership team. We used a 360 leadership assessment to understand their strengths individually and as a team. They each received feedback on their own results and together we debriefed the results of the team. As a group, we worked on leadership behaviors that promote a positive working environment. They also identified areas where they can improve. It was not easy at first, there was denial, rationalization and finding blame. These reactions are normal. As soon as we got past these responses and they accepted that they needed to change, we started working on their plans. Over the past year and a half, Bill and his team evolved to be the leaders that they want to be.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/executive-coach-yes/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

Three reasons why you should have an executive coach

Why should you have an executive coach?

Executive Coach Liza Sichon

How can I help your career today?

As you progress in your career, you will need to plan and strategize how you can grow with someone you can trust. What are the key learning experiences that you need to have to get you to your dream career? A trained executive coach will help you grow your leadership and your career.

Some of the many benefits you can get from your coach

An executive coach can hold up the mirror and reflect back your problems, thoughts and ideas back to you. Your coach will listen attentively and objectively. She will ask you deeper questions on matters involving your career that you haven’t considered. Sad but true, people need extra training on how to listen. Coaches have that training. Therapists have that training. Coworkers, spouses and friends…probably do not.

You get a supportive and trusting professional relationship focused on your career goals. You share your concerns confidentially with your executive coach. You work together and create a strong bond. You may explore different options and avenues that you didn’t know existed. A coach will create a secrecy pact with you. Coaches are bound to keep your conversations confidential. You can be open and honest with your coach. Your thoughts and feelings will remain private. Can you say the same about secrets you tell your friends, neighbors and coworkers? Is your career advancement worth a conversation with a coach?

An executive coach will challenge you to think outside your boundaries or free you of your limiting thoughts. The coach may push you out of your comfort zone to explore areas where you haven’t ventured. You can expand your thinking about where you are taking your career. Friends, neighbors and coworkers will tell you, “You have a nice car, a nice house and nice clothes. You have made it.” An executive coach will challenge you to evaluate your career and be clear on your long term vision. You will set higher expectations and enjoy the rewards.

I have a new client, Daphne. She thought she would remain a middle manager forever. “That’s just how it is with women in the workplace,” she told me. “We have a glass ceiling. Career growth is not as promising as it is for men. Also, I am already 48. I cannot advance.” Her employer knew she had potential and brought in an executive coach for her. I am helping her overcome those self-limiting beliefs.

In just a few months, she has reevaluated her career. She sees more senior level opportunities. She is asking what she needs to do before she can become a serious candidate for a VP role. She no longer thinks only men can advance. Daphne believes the sky is the limit.

For more, see http://executivehrcoach.com/executive-coach-yes/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon

Leading Effectively with Emotional Intelligence for the HR Professional

NCHRA LogoSAN JOSE, CA. — Executive HR Coach, LLC, is pleased to announce Managing Director, Liza Sichon will be presenting Leading Effectively with Emotional Intelligence at the NCHRA Training Center on June 18, 2014 along with Dr. Relly Nadler. Participants will learn how being aware of your own emotional intelligence improves your decision making ability and drives your leadership performance forward, key components needed by successful HR professionals.

Key takeaways include:

  • Assess your own emotional style using the Nadler EI Star Profile
  • Apply emotional intelligence skills and tools in your own work environment
  • Create a personal development plan to improve your emotional intelligence
  • Develop an action plan with specific steps to implement immediately
  • 5 Strategic/General Recertification Credits.

“Emotional Intelligence or EQ is ability to manage from the head and from the heart in its simplest terms,” says presenter Liza Sichon. “There are four areas of emotional intelligence: Self Awareness, Self Management, Social Awareness and Relationship Management. This joint interactive workshop presentation by Sichon and Nadler will include an assessment of your own emotional intelligence using the Nadler EI Self Assessment.”

Participants will leave the conference with a thorough understanding of how to apply these strategies in the workplace.

Liza Sichon is the Managing Director of Executive HR Coach, LLC, a Silicon-valley based human resource and career consultancy will speak on attracting, developing and retaining effective global leaders. Liza is an experienced executive coach, notable speaker, and global HR consultant with over twenty years of corporate experience working for large, multi-national firms. Originally from the Philippines, and now based in Silicon Valley, California, Liza held global HR positions across the Americas, EMEA, Asia Pacific and Latin America.

Most recently, Liza served as the Vice President HR Transformation, Communications and Operations for Hewlett Packard’s global HR function, serving 2,400 HR professionals. Prior to this, Liza worked for Avaya as the Vice President HR International & Mergers and Acquisitions for various profit centers in Americas, Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America. In this role, she was responsible for HR strategy and global operations for over 30 countries outside the US. Liza also held HR leadership roles at Corning Life Sciences in New Jersey, Citibank in New York, and Anscor Corporation in the Philippines.

Liza is known for her broad business orientation and deep working knowledge of global leadership. She has extensive coaching experience and is an expert on talent management and career navigation. Additionally, her career included extensive speaking engagements to diverse global audiences as well as notable universities such as the Harvard MBA Women’s Conference.

She is a sought after motivational speaker sharing her insights in the areas of career success for women, the benefits of executive coaching, HR transformation, and developing global talent. Executive HR Coach can be reached at (408) 217-9074 and http://executivehrcoach.com.

This workshop will occur at the NCHRA Training Center, 233 Sansome Street, Suite 508, San Francisco, CA 94104. Online registration is available at NCHRA.

Three Valuable Lessons I Learned in my Global Assignment

woman globeIt has been several years since our expat assignment in Belgium but the experience remains fresh in my mind. The two years we spent in Belgium strengthened not only my career and understanding of global business but also my family’s bond.  The experience enriched our lives. Being an Asian American female executive in Europe sent by an American company holding the top job was not common those days.  I was not the typical expat, therefore I was not stereotyped and eventually, I think my uniqueness worked to my advantage.

 

  1. I learned what it takes to work closely and intensely with people from different countries. I learned to accept and appreciate differences including my own uniqueness. I learned that No did not necessarily mean No and Yes did not mean Yes.  I learned to probe further to understand others. I learned to flex my style to be effective.
  2. Since time was limited and we knew this experience would not last, we made instant friends.  We valued our new friends and chose which ones were going to remain our friends even when we moved back home.
  3. I learned a lot about myself. My executive coach was invaluable to me.  At our very first meeting he said since I am Filipino American, I am viewed as an Asian in Europe even if I came from the US.   They expected me to demonstrate typical Asian norms, because this what they know.  I realized how much I’ve forgotten or abandoned being Asian having lived in the US for most of my career years. I took a journey back to who I really am. It was quite an experience to have the freedom to be me again and get in touch with my “Filipina-ness”.

I will never forget my coach, Robert Brown, who helped me navigate through several difficult situations. He became an ally to me, a trusted advisor, mentor and friend.  He introduced me to a new business network who helped me understand local business better. He genuinely cared for my success and became a close family friend.  Sadly, Robert passed away a few years ago.  His influence on my life, career and our family was invaluable and we are forever grateful.

If you are in an expat assignment today or working outside your home country, you may be experiencing a range of emotions – from excitement to frustration.  From loneliness – missing your friends and family , to enjoying meeting new people and discovering new sights and experiences.  How are you viewed by your local colleagues?  What impact does your presence have on them?  How can you make the most of your expat assignment?

 

Join us at The Conference Board, Global HR Academy on June 9-12 and learn more about what it takes to be successful in a global role.  To read more about the Academy, click here http://www.conference-board.org/globalhrleadersacademy/.

 

To apply and receive special pricing, contact Fana Tekle at fana.tekle@conferenceboard.org or call her at 212-339-0210.

 

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Why Hire a coach?

Top Reasons Coaches are Engaged:

(HBR Jan 2009)

    • Develop high potentials or facilitate transition: 48%
    • Act as a sounding board: 26%
    • Address derailing behavior: 12%