HR Professionals

As an HR Leader, do you have emotional intelligence?

How emotionally intelligent is the job candidate? You have to find out before you hire this person.

How emotionally intelligent is the job candidate? You have to find out before you hire this person.

Do you hire for emotional intelligence?

Most HR professionals and recruiters traditionally hire for cognitive intelligence, relevant experience and education.  One aspect overlooked especially in hiring for leadership and managerial positions is to hire for emotionally intelligent leaders who can empower and motivate their teams to reach their highest potential.  Emotional intelligent managers can enable their teams to overcome barriers.  An emotionally intelligent HR leader is aware of the impact of hiring managers who are strong intellectually and emotionally.

 

Leaders are not always aware of their impact on others or if they are remotely aware, they usually underestimate how powerful their impact truly is.  Knowledge of Emotional Intelligence can help you find candidates who can rise to the top of their game, manage complex, difficult and unpredictable situations, and encourage their peers and co-workers to do their best.

 

If you are responsible for hiring, what questions could you ask to determine someone’s emotional intelligence?  In a workshop I co-facilitated with Dr. Relly Nadler for HR Professionals in San Francisco, we identified some questions that could help you determine a candidate’s emotional intelligence.   Dr. Relly Nadler in his book, Leading with Emotional Intelligence recommends behavioral dimensions correlated with the 20 emotional intelligence competencies or EQ.  Here are some of the competencies and examples of questions that you could ask job candidates:

 

Interview questions

  1. Initiative – Give me an example of when you had to go the extra mile for your customer. What did you do and what was the result?
  2. Self Control – When was the last time you were frustrated with your co-worker or customer?  What did you do and say?
  3. Empathy – How do you demonstrate that you are open to ideas and solutions other than you own?
  4. Building Bonds – Tell me an example of an opportunity you developed and successfully received from networking.
  5. Self Confidence – How do you get ready for a big presentation or meeting?
  6. Adaptability – Give me an example when you had to work with a difficult co-worker?

Depending on the role or position that you are hiring, you can evaluate a candidate’s knowledge of themselves, also known as self-awareness, their own self-management, understanding others and managing others – the four main components of emotional intelligence.

 

Emotional Intelligence is contagious.  I once had a boss who loved people.  The entire building literally brightens up when he walks into the office.  He  not only knows people by their first name, he knows their children’s names and even their dog’s names. People would do anything for him, the discretionary effort of his team was beyond limits.  He is so loved and remembered fondly, that is because he truly and sincerely cared for others. Working with him was one of the most enjoyable times in my career.

 

Ever wondered what impact you have on others?  It is not too late to develop your emotional intelligence.  Emotionally Intelligent people get hired, promoted and have a sustaining presence.  The good news is EQ can be learned, developed and improved with the help of a trusted coach.  What does it take to be an emotionally intelligent HR leader?  As HR professionals, we set the tone for an emotionally intelligent culture.  Are you aware of the impact your presence has on others?

 

Liza Sichon is the founder of Executive HR Coach. She coaches executives and their teams on how they can meet their financial goals, advance their careers and live fulfilling lives.  For more information, visit her website http://executivehrcoach.com/emotional-intelligence-need/ and http://www.linkedin.com/in/lizasichon/.

How Emotionally Intelligent are you?

women smilingI had lunch with my assistant before I left my corporate world.  She is fabulous and the best I ever had, I love her.  She smilingly asked me if I remember what I said to her when she told me a couple of months ago that she needed surgery.  I honestly did not remember what I said to her.  She helped me recall that the first thing I said was to request for the calendar.  We looked at how many days she was going to take off, when that would be and how the work can be handled while she was gone.  That was my first impulse, first thing I said!.  Of course, I cared about her, but I was more focused on the task.  To this day, I am so embarrassed about my behavior, I commit to be more sensitive to others in my relationships, but that time, I did not know how.  In hindsight, I knew that at that moment, I lacked empathy and was totally unaware.

Dr. Relly Nadler and I had a wonderful time facilitating our workshop: Leading with Emotional Intelligence for the HR Professional at the San Francisco office of SHRM (Society of Human Resources Management).   As a recovered task focused, hard charging HR refugee, I had fun teaching the concepts of Emotional Intelligence with our participants.  Here are some take-aways from the workshop:

1. One aspect of Emotional Intelligence is about being aware of your thoughts and feelings in the moment.  When you are in the midst of a debate or argument, or under a tight deadline, what do you do?  You may opt to continue to work just to get the task done.  The emotionally intelligent person will know when to take a high quality break.  Yes, the quality of the break matters. How can you best relieve your body and mind of stress that could drop your decision-making ability and IQ points?  Take a brief walk around the block, journal your thoughts and feelings or talk to a trusted friend for at least 20 minutes, then go back to the task at hand.  Sitting in the couch watching TV or reaching for that candy bar will not improve your EQ and will make you sluggish when you get back to work, dropping IQ points.

2. Honestly think about your relationship with your boss.  A Hay study found out that 50% of life satisfaction comes from your relationship with your boss and 75% of employees say that dealing with their boss is the most stressful part of their day.  If you do not have a good relationship  with your boss or if you are in denial about how bad your relationship is with your boss, you may be losing IQ and EQ points that affect your work or may be getting sick without you knowing it.  Find out what you can do to improve this relationship, if all else fails, find another job.

3. The good news about Emotional Intelligence is that it can be learned and improved, unlike IQ which is set.  It is never too late to improve your relationships at work and at home.  The first place to start is not to focus on other people’s short comings, but with yourself. Participants in the workshop took the Nadler EI self assessment and were paired with peer coaches to focus on at least two strengths to leverage and potential derailers.  The participants created an action plan to develop their EQ.

Emotions are like the flu, they are contagious.  Just watch your boss’ emotions and it travels like wildfire.  Leaders underestimate the impact they have on people. It is not just their decision-making and analytical ability that impacts the team, it is also their emotions. As a leader, how much emotional self-control, self-awareness and relationship investment capital do you have with your co-workers and team members?    How do you increase this to be at the top of your game?

Liza Sichon is an Executive Coach, Speaker and HR Consultant located in Silicon Valley.  Visit her website at http://executivehrcoach.com

 

 

 

 

 

Leading Effectively with Emotional Intelligence for the HR Professional

NCHRA LogoSAN JOSE, CA. — Executive HR Coach, LLC, is pleased to announce Managing Director, Liza Sichon will be presenting Leading Effectively with Emotional Intelligence at the NCHRA Training Center on June 18, 2014 along with Dr. Relly Nadler. Participants will learn how being aware of your own emotional intelligence improves your decision making ability and drives your leadership performance forward, key components needed by successful HR professionals.

Key takeaways include:

  • Assess your own emotional style using the Nadler EI Star Profile
  • Apply emotional intelligence skills and tools in your own work environment
  • Create a personal development plan to improve your emotional intelligence
  • Develop an action plan with specific steps to implement immediately
  • 5 Strategic/General Recertification Credits.

“Emotional Intelligence or EQ is ability to manage from the head and from the heart in its simplest terms,” says presenter Liza Sichon. “There are four areas of emotional intelligence: Self Awareness, Self Management, Social Awareness and Relationship Management. This joint interactive workshop presentation by Sichon and Nadler will include an assessment of your own emotional intelligence using the Nadler EI Self Assessment.”

Participants will leave the conference with a thorough understanding of how to apply these strategies in the workplace.

Liza Sichon is the Managing Director of Executive HR Coach, LLC, a Silicon-valley based human resource and career consultancy will speak on attracting, developing and retaining effective global leaders. Liza is an experienced executive coach, notable speaker, and global HR consultant with over twenty years of corporate experience working for large, multi-national firms. Originally from the Philippines, and now based in Silicon Valley, California, Liza held global HR positions across the Americas, EMEA, Asia Pacific and Latin America.

Most recently, Liza served as the Vice President HR Transformation, Communications and Operations for Hewlett Packard’s global HR function, serving 2,400 HR professionals. Prior to this, Liza worked for Avaya as the Vice President HR International & Mergers and Acquisitions for various profit centers in Americas, Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America. In this role, she was responsible for HR strategy and global operations for over 30 countries outside the US. Liza also held HR leadership roles at Corning Life Sciences in New Jersey, Citibank in New York, and Anscor Corporation in the Philippines.

Liza is known for her broad business orientation and deep working knowledge of global leadership. She has extensive coaching experience and is an expert on talent management and career navigation. Additionally, her career included extensive speaking engagements to diverse global audiences as well as notable universities such as the Harvard MBA Women’s Conference.

She is a sought after motivational speaker sharing her insights in the areas of career success for women, the benefits of executive coaching, HR transformation, and developing global talent. Executive HR Coach can be reached at (408) 217-9074 and http://executivehrcoach.com.

This workshop will occur at the NCHRA Training Center, 233 Sansome Street, Suite 508, San Francisco, CA 94104. Online registration is available at NCHRA.

Looking to develop your global talent and succession plans?

10775418-global-business-people-handshake-to-agree-in-international-economy-pactIs your HR staff equipped to expand your global business? Are you looking to advance your global HR career, accelerate your thinking and network with a select peer group? Join us at The Conference Board’s 20th Leadership Development Conference on June 3-5 in San Diego, CA.

At the June 3 seminar on Succession Management, I will speak on identifying, assessing and developing your global talent pipeline.

  • You will learn where to begin to develop your company’s global succession plans.
  • Take the global assessment and learn areas you need to develop to make you a more effective global leader.
  • Network and learn from other practitioners in your field.

The Succession Management Seminar has been an important element of the Leadership Development Conferences since 2005 and attracts senior practitioners who are looking for both thought leadership and best practices/tools/implementation ideas from leading companies. The audience is always deeply engaged in the topic and enjoys the chance to interact closely with peers and with speakers.

For the Agenda and to register, see Global Leaders

 

 

 

 

Is your HR Staff equipped to build a succession plan?

TheConferenceBoard

 

Join us at The Conference Board’s 20th Annual Leadership Development Conference and Succession Management Seminar

I am delighted to speak on Assessing and Developing Global Talent at the Succession Management Seminar on June 3 in San Diego, CA.

The seminar  includes:

  • A personal assessment of your current global capability using the Transglobal Leadership Assessment;
  • Tools and techniques to move your organization’s succession management capability

For the Agenda, see Global Leaders . To register, visit the sign up page.

What does it take to be a global leader?

EmpoweringTeams2013

What does it take to be a global leader?

Tasked with identifying and developing talent for global assignments?

Have you recently been assigned to lead a global team?

Is your company in the midst of a global expansion?

  A couple of months ago, I was asked to coach a senior global leader, on an expat assignment in the US who was very successful in his country but could not replicate his success here in the US. Having a global assignment and being successful in your country does not guarantee success in a global role.   Join us at 20th Annual The Leadership Conference of The Conference Board, on June 3-5 in San Diego, CA.  The pre conference on Succession Planning will help you  to deepen your own global acumen, learn the key leadership behaviors of successful global leaders and walk away with succession planning tools. 1. Uncertainty Resilience – someone who comfortably adjusts to changes and complexities. 2. Team Connectivity – someone who integrates and connects ideas and people across boundaries. 3. Flexibility – ability to adjust their style in a practical way considering local and global norms. 4. Responsiveness – use customize and appropriate ways to address, motivate, inspire others 5. Talent Orientation – personally involved in the customized development of their own people. It is no surprise that building teams and connecting people while taking into consideration the uncertain and constantly changing global environment are critical leadership qualities of a successful global leader. Find out how prepared you are to take on a global assignment or lead others to succeed in global roles.

For the Agenda, see Global Leaders . To register, visit the sign up page.

Where is your organization in the global maturity curve?

global assignment– Your company has just expanded globally

– You want to apply for a global role but you do not have the experience

– You have just been selected for a global assignment, but are unsure about your own capabilities

You may be experiencing these or similar apprehensions about being a global leader, but you do not need to be concerned.  Join a select group of leaders at the 20th Annual Leadership Development Conference of the Conference Board on June 3-5 in San Diego, CA 

The Succession Management Pre Conference will help you:

  • Learn a global assessment tool to identify and develop high potential talent
  • Understand where your company is on the global organizational maturity curve
  • Identify tools and techniques to build your succession plans

For the Agenda, see Global Leaders . To register, visit the sign up page.

We look forward to seeing you.

 

Invitation: The Global HR Leaders Academy

The Global HR Leaders AcademyHR Colleagues:

Wondering how to take your career to the next level?  Want to ensure you are prepared to take on broader global responsibilities? Join a small cohort of colleagues across diverse industries and  a practitioner faculty that will deepen your acumen, broaden your network, and prepare you for expanded responsibility in your organization on June 9-12 at the Conference Board in New York City.

The Conference Board’s Global HR Leaders Academy welcomes experienced, mid to senior-level HR leaders with growing global responsibilities. Led by an expert faculty in a small group environment, the Global HR Academy experience includes:

  • A personal, confidential assessment of your current global capability using the Trans-Global Leadership Assessment
  • A 3-day intensive learning experience, coupled with pre-and post-event webcasts
  • Simulations, interactive case studies with experienced practitioners from leading companies, individualized coaching and a personalized action plan
  • Tools and techniques to help move your organization’s HR capability up the maturity curve
  • Global HR Leader Certification and 13.5 HRCI credits

To learn more about the Academy, click here. https://www.conference-board.org/globalhrleadersacademy/

We are offering a one time special rate of $2,500 for the June cohort only.  To avail of the discount, contact Fana Tekle at fana.tekle@conferenceboard.org or 212.339.0210 and mention this posting from me.

We look forward to welcoming you to the Academy.

 

When is it time for the HR Department to hire a Coach

team happyIt is so much easier for HR functions to review, analyze, solve HR problems for the business, it is harder for them to confront or handle their own problems. Multiple deadlines, pressure, urgent issues of the day take over priorities while having long hours at work.

It is tough to be in HR, you are expected to know it all and solve most, if not all people problems.  You are also expected to have the best run function.  If HR cannot solve their own problems, their credibility erodes.

There are times, though, when the HR function needs to carve out special time to openly and non judgmentally discuss their own problems and take appropriate actions with an experienced executive coach. HR knows the answer to their problems, a coach will serve as a partner, hold up a mirror and guide them through resolving their own issues.

What are the some situations when HR would need to bring in an Executive Coach?

  1. When the team is new and forming, a coach could help set up a strong team foundation and build trust
  2. When the leader wants to build a stronger team
  3. When you are stuck and struggling with important decisions that affect the team
  4. When you or your team members feel plateaued in your career
  5. When you are newly promoted or exiting the company
  6. When your function is not as effective as it needs to be
  7. When you are cruising and unsure of your career direction
  8. When the team is not working well together
  9. When you or your team are having a crisis of confidence
  10. When you or your function receive feedback that surprises you

These situations may be troubling and scary. You cannot discuss these openly with your other colleagues for fear of being judged.  You are in HR, you are supposed to know how to resolve your own problems. Your spouse, partner or best friend can listen and suggest, but they do not know the unique situation you are in.

I’ve seen coaching benefit so many people. Whatever your career or work challenges are, an executive coach can shift your thinking so you can come up with the appropriate actions and perform at your peak.

Top 10 Reasons Why HR Professionals Need a Coach

woman executiving talkingHR professionals recommend executive coaching to their business leaders for specific reasons. These reasons could be to enhance current performance, develop future potential, acquire new skills and behaviors or any agenda that an executive may choose.

In my experience, HR professionals do not need to be convinced about the value of executive coaching, some of them are coaches themselves.  However, they are not as savvy in knowing and admitting when they need their own coach, sometimes it is too late.  The most commonly cited reason for holding back is budget, or sometimes you think you can resolve your own gaps quietly.  It is also easier to ignore your own weaknesses, hide it or wish it away.  You don’t want to direct any attention to yourself.  HR just like any function needs growth, nurturing and development. Coaching is an investment for the HR function. Here are 10 reasons why HR professionals need coaching.

  1. Executive coaching is a fast growing required competency for the future.  Having executive coaching skills in your resume elevates your career opportunities and sets you apart.  Executive coaches believe in coaching for themselves, they practice what they preach.
  2. HR holds up the mirror for their organization, you need to have your own mirror to reveal your own thinking, motives and flaws.  A coach, with permission, will cut through the clutter and help you clarify your thinking.
  3. HR needs to be at the top of their game to face the multiple challenges of their role. A coach can get you to peak and sustainable performance.
  4. You need to sharpen your skills and knowledge, no different from your business leaders.  A coach can help you meet this objective.
  5. HR people are always multi-tasking, managing multiple priorities and deadlines.  I’ve never met an HR person who is not extremely busy, which sometimes could lead to stress.  You could use some down time with a coach to step back, reflect and strategize.
  6. HR can quickly become the shoemakers children, instead HR needs to be the role model for the organization.
  7. By the nature of your job, you can be more internally focused.  You could use some stretching and outside influence to broaden or shift your perspective.
  8. Coaching prices are  flexible.  One of the reasons HR professionals do not hire coaches, is because of the costs. There are many alternatives to individual coaching. Using proven coaching methods, you can set up peer coaching or you can work with a trained group coach.
  9. You are a trusted advisor but who can you trust?  HR can be a lonely place.  You cannot confide to anyone internally and your spouse or partner will not really understand your unique challenges. You need a trusted executive coach who will be honest and non-judgmental.
  10. Coaching just cannot be done through self-service.  An intimate and trusting coaching relationship requires human interaction.

I’ve been fortunate to have been in HR teams that believe in coaching.  These have been some of the most rewarding times in my corporate career.  What I recall is the mindset and collaboration that we are all in this together, that we can handle anything that comes our way, knowing that we have the support of every member of the team.  Our coach made sure that we were always aware of the value that each team member brought to the group.  These relationships outlasted jobs, roles and companies and kept very strong bonds even after all of us have moved on.

Do you need a Coach?  I’d love to work with you.  Find about my executive coaching services at http://www.executivehrcoach.com

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Why Hire a coach?

Top Reasons Coaches are Engaged:

(HBR Jan 2009)

    • Develop high potentials or facilitate transition: 48%
    • Act as a sounding board: 26%
    • Address derailing behavior: 12%