Why HR professionals think they do not need a coach

woman executiving talkingI had a conversation with an HR Executive recently about her business leader who needs an Executive Coach.  In the process of our conversation, she realized that she also wanted to have her own coach.  But she is hesitant to hire one.

Why is it that HR professionals quickly diagnose when a situation needs coaching but rarely do they raise their hands to ask for their own coach? Here are some reasons:

1. They may be embarrassed to admit that they cannot resolve their own leadership gaps?

2. They are used to solving other people’s problems, and are hesitant to face their own?

3. They do not think they deserve to have their own coach.  We are conditioned to being viewed as an expense.

4. They don’t want to call attention to themselves or be viewed as having a “problem”.  To the unenlightened, having a coach was traditionally  and incorrectly viewed as being a failure.

During the course of our conversation, I offered to coach her.  She was very thankful for the coaching conversation.  She is sharp, energetic and strategic but suffered from having everything in her head.  Talking through her options and choices empowered and refreshed her.  She became clearer on her course of action.

Working through issues with my coach have been some of the most powerful dialogues I’ve had in my career.  The answers have always been within me, I just needed a trusted advisor and partner to work through my options without judgement.

If you  need to work through certain choices, or are in the midst of transition or change, feel stuck or overwhelmed, work it through with a trained executive coach or email me at liza@executivehrcoach.com for a complimentary session.

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Why Hire a coach?

Top Reasons Coaches are Engaged:

(HBR Jan 2009)

    • Develop high potentials or facilitate transition: 48%
    • Act as a sounding board: 26%
    • Address derailing behavior: 12%